DIY: How to Seafoam the 3.8 V6 - Hyundai Genesis Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 10-22-2014 Thread Starter
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DIY: How to Seafoam the 3.8 V6

Several people have asked how to do this so I've put together the following DIY, this will apply to all versions of the V6. Before I start let me just say there are several variations on how to use this product but I'm going to at least show you the best way to deliver Seafoam into the engine as well as my best opinion on how to much to use and where to use it.

First off your car needs to meet the following criteria:

- Must be within ~100 miles of your next oil change interval, you're going to put Seafoam in your oil which will thin it slightly, so also don't do this if you're overdue for an oil change
- The car must be cold, do not Seafoam a hot engine or you could risk it igniting inside your crankcase

What you will need:

- 1 16oz. bottle of Seafoam, can be purchased at any auto store
- 1 measuring cup that you won't ever use in the kitchen again (I happen to have one I use for car stuff, measuring catch can collection, etc)
- 1 length of 1/2" ID hose approximately 2 feet long, fuel line, trans cooler line, whatever you can easily source from your local parts store
- A pair of pliers or a socket to remove the PCV hose from the intake plenum, I have a catch can so mine is attached with a hose clamp that requires a socket, if your PCV hose is stock then you'll need pliers for the pinch clamp that's on there
- A funnel
- Someone to help you, as you're introducing the Seafoam to the car it will want to stall and because we have an electronic throttle you can't hold the throttle open slightly from the engine bay
- Optional: A code scanner in case you get a vacuum leak CEL that needs to be cleared




Step 1: Remove the PCV hose from the intake plenum, use your wrench or pliers to loosen the clamp and pull it down the hose an inch or so, then rocking and twisting ease the hose off of the nipple.



Step 2: Move the PCV hose aside, red circle again below, if you're not using the stock pinch clamp I'd remove your clamp like I did so it doesn't fall into the engine bay, the pinch clamp will stay on the hose. Now run your length of 1/2" hose under the intake and throttle body from the front of the car and up to the hose nipple, work the hose onto the nipple, the hose will fit snugly with some force but don't force it too much. You won't need a clamp to hold the hose on there.




Step 3: Measure out the Seafoam that will go into your intake, here's where techniques can differ. For the oil treatment the product recommends using 1.5oz per quart of oil, with our ~5.5qt capacity that's 8.25oz. of Seafoam, I'm rounding to 8.5oz., leaving 7.5oz. which I will put into the intake. One of the other uses of Seafoam is as a fuel treatment to help clean injectors but I use only premium detergent fuel so I'm going to skip that step and use the entire can in my intake and oil. Some people recommend a 1/3 technique, putting 1/3 of the can in the intake, 1/3 in the oil and 1/3 in the fuel, you can do that as well if you want to cover all of your bases.



Step 4: Have your helper get in the car and start it, it will run rough as you have created a vacuum leak by disconnecting the PCV hose, you will also likely get a vacuum leak CEL, nothing to worry about as you're only running it like this for a minute or two. Have them give the car gas as needed to help keep the car from stalling as you introduce the Seafoam, 1000-2000 RPMs or so. Take the end of the hose and while holding it against the inside of the measuring cup slowly lower it towards the Seafoam until the vacuum starts to suck up the liquid, don't stick the hose into the Seafoam, remember you want to introduce it slowly. Let the car suck up the liquid at it's own pace until you get to the last ounce or so, once you get to the last ounce plunge the hose in and let the car suck in the remaining fluid all at once and immediately after have your helper cut the engine, this last step will ensure a healthy dose of the Seafoam is in the crankcase to help break up deposits as it sits.

I don't have a picture of this part sorry, it takes two hands!

Step 5: Let the car sit for 30 minutes. While you do add the remaining Seafoam to your oil using your funnel and reattach the PCV hose to the intake plenum. If you got a CEL from the process you can clear it now with a scanner, the code should also clear itself after some normal driving.



Step 6: After 30 minutes start the car and let it run for a while, it'll run rough at first and you're going to get a lot of white smoke, keep the car idling until the smoke starts to decrease and the engine runs smoothly again. Now take it for a drive to help clear the remaining Seafoam from the intake and crankcase, about 10 miles, you'll continue to get some smoke for the first couple of miles.




You can plan to do your last ~100 miles of driving now and change your oil right away when you get back, or plan a time in the next couple of days to do the oil change, just don't let it go too long!

That's it! I plan on doing this every 10,000 miles or every other oil change since I have the GDI V6, hopefully along with my catch cans it will help ensure my engine will see as little valve deposit build up as possible.

2013 3.8 Track Pearl White

Last edited by inertiamonster; 10-22-2014 at 02:03 PM.
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post #2 of 12 Old 10-27-2014
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You might also want to try cleaning the carbon out by misting water into the engine air intake. There is numerous anecdotal evidence that this works - just google for "clean carbon from engine with water", or a variation thereof, and have used it myself on older cars of my own without a problem, but have not used it recently on newer cars, as I haven't needed to. Also, cleaning carbon is a known side benefit of water injection and water injection is safely used quite a bit, especially for turbo engines, and I offer the following links I found that I think are worth special attention:
-- the first is a patent application for a device that uses water to clean carbon buildup from the inside of an engine a ENGINE CLEANING SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR CLEANING CARBON DEPOSITS IN ENGINES - Patent application. It's kind of hard to follow, but the patent application seems to indicate that this process has been tested quite a bit during the development of the application.
-- the 2nd is an article where someone misted water into the intake of a single cylinder engine that had carbon buildup, with before and after teardown pictures, to test the hypothesis that water would clean up carbon buildup TEST RESULTS
USING WATER TO CLEAN CARBON OUT OF A GASOLINE ENGINE

-- and the 3rd is an article about "water gas" Water gas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This article, I believe, documents why water cleans up the carbon in an engine. Most people think that the water "steam cleans" the carbon out. But this article documents a well known chemical reaction where water (H2O) combines with red-hot carbon (C) to produce hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO). Essentially, the carbon is turned into a gas.

If I'm right, and it is the "water gas" reaction that cleans the carbon, then the only thing I'm not sure about is whether the carbon buildup on the intake valves gets hot enough for the "water-gas" reaction to take place. It also means that the engine should be fully warmed up before you start misting the water in.

Given the above, I think this could be helpful, and don't see how it could cause any harm, as long as you are careful and mist the water into the intake. Do NOT pour the water into the intake as you might see in some articles. Although, in the past when I did this, I did pour the water into the engine fast enough to cause the engine to stumble sometimes, and never had a problem, I would not do that today after my research and learning about the water-gas reaction. The water-gas reaction will take place no matter how slowly you inject the water into the engine, so take your time. Here's a link to a video showing someone doing the procedure on a VW TDI https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=Ugn8TI0TMio
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post #3 of 12 Old 10-28-2014 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wmsky33 View Post
You might also want to try cleaning the carbon out by misting water into the engine air intake. There is numerous anecdotal evidence that this works - just google for "clean carbon from engine with water", or a variation thereof, and have used it myself on older cars of my own without a problem, but have not used it recently on newer cars, as I haven't needed to. Also, cleaning carbon is a known side benefit of water injection and water injection is safely used quite a bit, especially for turbo engines
So the major issue we're trying to prevent is carbon buildup on the outside of intake valves, all of the "examples" of this working only show the inside of the combustion chamber, and they are almost all older motors (carbureted or port injected) or simple engines like lawn mowers or generators. I couldn't find any non-anecdotal evidence that this works to clean the intake valves or that it works on a modern engine at all, especially a DI engine.

Water/meth injection is a known method for helping to prevent carbon build up but it will do little or nothing to remove existing deposits. It's also well known the the valve buildup in DI engines especially can not be effectively cleaned by any method other than a mechanical cleaning, catch cans and chemical treatments are only preventative measures, so I can assume this will not be effective for the GDI V6.

Until someone does a tear down test of this method on a modern engine, preferably a DI motor, showing intake valve deposits before and after, I'm going to stick with my methods.

Also the guy in the video made a catch can out of a baby food jar, so yeah, I'm going to toss that piece of evidence out of court on principle alone.

2013 3.8 Track Pearl White

Last edited by inertiamonster; 10-28-2014 at 03:42 PM.
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post #4 of 12 Old 11-08-2014
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Awesome write up Inertiamonster!!

I have not been in the forums in some time but wish I was. I just changed my oil but will do it next time for sure, and agree with you every other oil change will be the way.
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My pleasure, let me know if you have questions when you're ready to do this next oil change.
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post #6 of 12 Old 09-29-2016
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forgive me if I may misread but this process cleans out the throttle body? Intake manifold etc correct? Would you recommend going in a wiping down the butterfly, TB walls etc ?
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It does a little, mostly (hopefully) it's cleaning the intake valves and combustion chambers. Yes, a physical cleaning is always going to yield better results. Buy some throttle body cleaner, remove the throttle body, plenum and intake manifold and go to town on all of it if you can, I'm gearing up to do just that including an intake valve cleaning, sometime later this year. If you only want to clean the throttle without removing it some throttle cleaner and a toothbrush will do the trick.
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So with doing this I would need new gaskets as I read that Hyundai uses paper ones? Does this only apply for the TB gasket?
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Taking everything apart? I don't believe you'll have to replace any of them depending on your mileage, I know for sure the ones for the manifold are metal. How many miles are you at?

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Thanks for the write up. Just tried this out.. (I think it worked). Only issue is I didn't put any in the oil and I got very little white smoke. I used 2/3 of a can and I got a little white smoke during that, and a little bit more after I started the car up again when I let it sit. Any idea why it didn't smoke much? Not sure if it's a good or bad sign, I feel like I did it correctly.

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The amount of smoke depends on how you do it, they key is to get as much of the Seafoam as possible to sit on top of the valves when you shut the car off to sit, so getting it into the intake quickly without stalling is key, as is that last heavy shot by fully submerging the hose as you have your helper turn the motor off.

FYI this is what I use now as it's much easier to use and it's meant for GDi applications, how well it works (or doesn't) I can't prove as I've never stuck a camera in the intake to see the condition of my valves.

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post #12 of 12 Old 01-24-2019
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Just bought that exact product and will be doing this soon. Also getting the catch can

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