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Thread: Cost of checking valve clearance @ 60k miles? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-07-2015 04:57 AM
MrDestinE
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Raspberry View Post
IIRC the original Vulcan block was rejected by Yamaha as not able to handle higher rpms. They made the entire engine with the unique intake dual runner arrangement. The block Yamaha made is good for 8500 rpm with the proper tuning.

The V8 had a modular cast block (60*) made in Canada and then shipped to Japan where Yamaha made the heads and intake. The whole thing was a compromise. Originally to use the dual runner intake similar to the v6 SVT Contour. But that was rejected and they conjured up the dual runners in the lower intake manifold. This is where the carbon built up.

You just could not get good power out of the V8 no matter what the programming. And the cams had a flaw that would cause them to spin in the pressed on sprockets and trash the valves as it was an interference motor. Common prevention was to weld the cams to the sprockets.

Ford quit making parts for the engine before they even quit making it and denied any problem with the engine at all.
I thought Yamaha built a block for that... Wiki says differently, but we all know how that goes.
Just an aside, there are many places that you can purchase shims ie: Goodson Machine Shop Tools, and many other Motorcycle Supplies. I think Goodson may sell shims individually, but most times you have to purchase entire kits of each individual size...(diameter)...
Thankx for the info,

TJ
09-07-2015 04:10 AM
Red Raspberry
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDestinE View Post
Now see what ya'll did..... Made me go research.... while I remembered the original was a v6 I had forgotten that they were placed on the Vulcan engine..

and Red, give me your opinion on them being the limiting factor.

TJ
IIRC the original Vulcan block was rejected by Yamaha as not able to handle higher rpms. They made the entire engine with the unique intake dual runner arrangement. The block Yamaha made is good for 8500 rpm with the proper tuning.

The V8 had a modular cast block (60*) made in Canada and then shipped to Japan where Yamaha made the heads and intake. The whole thing was a compromise. Originally to use the dual runner intake similar to the v6 SVT Contour. But that was rejected and they conjured up the dual runners in the lower intake manifold. This is where the carbon built up.

You just could not get good power out of the V8 no matter what the programming. And the cams had a flaw that would cause them to spin in the pressed on sprockets and trash the valves as it was an interference motor. Common prevention was to weld the cams to the sprockets.

Ford quit making parts for the engine before they even quit making it and denied any problem with the engine at all.
09-06-2015 04:11 PM
-fritz-
Quote:
Originally Posted by waz View Post
To reiterate - I'm talking about checking the valve clearances, not adjusting them.

That entails removing the engine cover, the engine side cover, the air cleaner assembly, the surge tank, the cylinder head cover, and sliding a feeler gauge between the valve & seat 24 times.

I just hope the dealer doesn't just open the hood and listen to the valve train and charge me for it, but I wouldn't put it past them.

I know the valve design requires removing the cams & timing chains and is big bucks, but I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.

I really don't think there's a problem with the valves, I just want to prevent the dealer from denying a power train warranty claim later based on a failure to maintain the car.

I'm just trying to do the 60k maintenance items (including replacing the antifreeze, manual tranny & differential fluid [I live in the mountains so its on the severe service schedule] and inspecting the valves) as cheaply as possible.

Surely some of you '10,'11, & '12 owners have had this done?
I had my 60,000 miler done about a month ago. No problems and I had just had the oil changed a week earlier so I could make a long weekend trip, so I passed on the OC at the insp. After a 10% veteran's discount they charged me a grand total of $326.42 USD. I have the ZF trans, and they said to wait on that and the coolant flush till 100,000 miles. They changed the diff. oil, but not sure if they checked the valves, though now at 64,000 miles, they are quiet. So not worried here. I have had numerous OH cam engines, that went well over 100,000 miles with no valve adjustments. Keeping the oil changed regularly helps that to be the case.
09-06-2015 03:56 PM
MrDestinE Now see what ya'll did..... Made me go research.... while I remembered the original was a v6 I had forgotten that they were placed on the Vulcan engine..

and Red, give me your opinion on them being the limiting factor.

TJ
09-06-2015 01:11 PM
hluckoff
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDestinE View Post
If memory serves the original Ford SHO was a Yamaha engine, that was a shocker..
But you would think Ford would carry parts, especially maintenance parts..

TJ
Only the Heads were designed by Yamaha on the original SHO.
09-06-2015 06:50 AM
Red Raspberry The original SHO was a V6. It had the shims too but you could not buy them either. They were a bit different and had a hole in them that you blasted with air to pop them out. The V8 had Yamaha heads which ironically were the weak link in that car.
09-06-2015 06:46 AM
MrDestinE
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Raspberry View Post
Last valve adjustment I made is when I put a new head on my Taurus V8 SHO. They had a tool to depress the bucket and then you used a magnet to pull out the shim. Ford did not carry the shims though. You had to buy used ones for get some from a Yamaha motorcycle dealer.....

If memory serves the original Ford SHO was a Yamaha engine, that was a shocker..
But you would think Ford would carry parts, especially maintenance parts..

TJ
09-06-2015 04:12 AM
Red Raspberry Last valve adjustment I made is when I put a new head on my Taurus V8 SHO. They had a tool to depress the bucket and then you used a magnet to pull out the shim. Ford did not carry the shims though. You had to buy used ones for get some from a Yamaha motorcycle dealer.....
09-05-2015 05:57 PM
MrDestinE Well for some reason my edit did not post... I closed my shop right after 9/11, just one of many that bit the dust due to that.... right at 14 years ago.... has it really been that long????
Anyways I doubt that I would have had a chance to see any of those engines especially with 10 year warranties.

TJ
09-05-2015 02:18 PM
bootsonground Last time I did a lash adjustment on one of my cars was back in 89 on my 85 BMW. at work it is different with truck engines, especially if they have a Jake brake.

All said and done. A survey from coast to coast of dealerships as to how many valve adjustments they have done per routine maintenance will answer a lot. But there has not been and will not be published, even if it had been surveyed. Adjusting valves is less common these days when taking into consideration that rockers are phased out more or less, and add the costs and complexity of OHC engines in general, few dole out the cash and simply sell or trade out first.
IMHO todays engines would have to be beaten hard or seriously neglected for the valve train to develop enough wear to even notice.
09-05-2015 01:53 PM
Red Raspberry Probably a good sign they are good for life.
09-05-2015 01:51 PM
MrDestinE Well....that just shows how well I have kept up,with Hyundai. ..... I am sitting here trying to remember.. I am thinking I have only seen one engine with the solid bucket but I was really,thinking it was of European flavor... People around here did not repair Hyundai or if they did it was at the dealer or perhaps sent to places specialized in such for performance builds..
Either way most was shim or hydraulic that I was repairing.....

TJ
09-05-2015 06:09 AM
Red Raspberry I don't think Hyundai has used anything but the buckets of different thickness for the last 15 years.
09-04-2015 07:36 PM
MrDestinE Seems a little odd, with hydraulic buckets good for 7200+ rpm, one would think Hyundai would have used them for these motors but seeing as how they used the utmost in a solid lifter you would think they were expecting tuner cars of much higher rpm... gotta wonder...

TJ
09-04-2015 05:30 PM
TsukubaRed_PA
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazukou View Post
i called a dealership about getting my valves done but they told me the valves on the gdis are self adjusting.... O_o
Wow, that is shocking. Scratch that dealer. Seriously there is not excuse for that type of response. I am sure many Hyundai's are, but not all.
09-04-2015 01:27 PM
wmunn
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazukou View Post
i called a dealership about getting my valves done but they told me the valves on the gdis are self adjusting.... O_o
Consider that your warning to never have it serviced there
09-04-2015 12:36 PM
Mazukou i called a dealership about getting my valves done but they told me the valves on the gdis are self adjusting.... O_o
09-04-2015 11:08 AM
MrDestinE I have had customers bring back cylinder heads of these types with bent valves telling me I screwed up the valve job, when they had assembled the heads on the block, installed the cams and then turned the cams to get it into time!!!! They did not understand that every thing had to be in time and stay that way. Some of the valves were bent enough to Crack the guides.
All of these type engines are a fine little instrument and one must be meticulous.

Thanks for the pics BadBoy!

TJ
09-04-2015 10:11 AM
BadBoyBill
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Raspberry View Post
It's in the Hyundai Service manual under

2.0 Engine Mechanical System - General Information.

Right after the compression test specifics.
if your referring to "Insert the SST(A) (09240-2G000) in the service hole of the timing chain cover and release the ratchet." then thats not going to keep anything from moving, that simply allows the tensioner stop to float forward and backward as opposed to normal operation where it only moves outward, but if you have remove the cams you will have to remove the entire front cover to redo the timing, theres no other way to get the timing correct as the cams and the sprockets on the cams are very tight fit and you would be risking a whole lots of parts getting messed up if you did it any other way.

I've built 26 of these engines so i have a pretty good understanding of how it goes together, but if i've over looked a process i'd surely love to know about it.
09-04-2015 09:53 AM
Red Raspberry It's in the Hyundai Service manual under

2.0 Engine Mechanical System - General Information.

Right after the compression test specifics.
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