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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't have my car yet so this question goes out to all the 3.8 owners. Have any of you tried using both regular and premium gas. I know you get 6 extra HP (306 to 312) with premium but can you really feel a difference between the two and is it worth the extra cash?
 

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Most Interesting Man
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Do you honestly think that you will feel a 2% boost in HP?
 

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Most Interesting Man
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Either they are full of ****, or there is something seriously wrong with their car when running on regular. Save your money because you will not notice a difference. The 3.8L V6 is engineered to run efficiently on regular with minimal performance loss.

Now the 2.0t might be a different story because turbo engines do run better on premium. Some cars like my brother's '95 Talon run on premium only.
 

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Alberta Genesis Club
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Either they are full of ****, or there is something seriously wrong with their car when running on regular. Save your money because you will not notice a difference. The 3.8L V6 is engineered to run efficiently on regular with minimal performance loss.

Now the 2.0t might be a different story because turbo engines do run better on premium. Some cars like my brother's '95 Talon run on premium only.
Or possibly the car makes better use of premium than hyundai has lead us to believe. Such things do happen, for example Chevy's LS2 engines typically dyno much higher than you would expect based upon their rated power.
 

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Ive been running premium since new, April 24, have 3000km and have been averageing 8l/100km. For the 8 cent diffrence, Ill keep running premium. It cant hurt your engine to do so, might get better mileage and may not gunk up your fuel system.
 

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The OG
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I'll run premium too. The dealer already knows what to have in the tank when I go to pick her up. :)
 

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Most Interesting Man
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Or possibly the car makes better use of premium than hyundai has lead us to believe. Such things do happen, for example Chevy's LS2 engines typically dyno much higher than you would expect based upon their rated power.
If that is the case, then wouldn't Hyundai benefit from advertising the higher HP output instead of just the 6 HP increase?

If there was a significant boost in performance, I would fill up with premium too. I just feel we are getting scammed at the pump already, so might as well save where we can.
 

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I drive a V6
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If that is the case, then wouldn't Hyundai benefit from advertising the higher HP output instead of just the 6 HP increase?

If there was a significant boost in performance, I would fill up with premium too. I just feel we are getting scammed at the pump already, so might as well save where we can.
No...their marketing team is playing a different card. Hyundai will lose the HP numbers game when put up against a certain Rival(G37) so its my feeling that they prefer to exploit the fact their product runs on regular.

It has been talked about in pretty much every test Ive seen. This is all about marketing strategy.
 

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Alberta Genesis Club
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If that is the case, then wouldn't Hyundai benefit from advertising the higher HP output instead of just the 6 HP increase?

If there was a significant boost in performance, I would fill up with premium too. I just feel we are getting scammed at the pump already, so might as well save where we can.
That can backfire if people start dynoing their cars and some of them don't make the advertised power.
Mazda learned all about rating their cars realistically... or maybe they didn't ;)

In North America and Europe a controversy arose when Mazda quoted the power output for the JDM model (155 hp) instead of the local market model (146 hp/110kW). Mazda offered to buy back the cars due to the misleading power claims. Owners who did not participate in the buy back were offered an apology and free servicing for the warranty period.
Drift Japan ? Mazda ? MX-5 Miata

In connection with the RX8’s horsepower rating: the original marketing material from Mazda North America (MNAO) advertised the 6 speed manual transmission RX8 at 247hp @ 8,500rpm. Assuming parasitic drivetrain loses between 17%-20% –common for modern rear wheel drive vehicles, a stock RX8 should measure between 205~197 horsepower at the rear wheels (rwhp) –depending on elevation, barometric pressure, temperature and correction factors applied. Instead, a stock RX8 chassis dyno run shows results ranging anywhere from mid-high ~160 to ~185rwhp. Such readings would represent parasitic drivetrain loses in excess of 25%. To say that, it is unacceptable to experience such a high level of loss through the drivetrain of a “sports car” with a carbon fiber drive shaft –amongst other things- is an understatement.
Mazda RX8 Horsepower Controversy
 

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Well I have had my car about a week and I have filled up on premium (2.0T) and I feel the difference on the power, for the difference and keeping the car and engine at optimum performance, I'll continue to fill up on premium.
 

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Most Interesting Man
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Sounds like Mazda got owned. I never heard of this before.
 

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I drive a V6
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Sounds like Mazda got owned. I never heard of this before.
If I recall correctly...Hyundai had a similar problem with the Tiburons back in the day.

Were rated at 140HP but were downgraded...its all a little foggy but there is some truth in here somewhere. (an ex GF bought a 1999 Tib SE)
 

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I tried using both... no difference.... maybe if i drove for 10 hours straight, than someone changed the gas as i am driving, than maybe.
 

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Former GTO hater/ owner
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Having just pounded out 2000 miles of vacation through the mountains of Tn, Va, Wv, and Pa, I can say that for most driving, I felt no difference, BUT, when enjoying leisurely cruising through the Smoky Mtn Nat'l Park, and along the Blue Ridge Pkwy, there is a low RPM throttle input delay when running 87 Octane, that I no longer felt when running 93 Octane.


To duplicate the delay, the engine had to be at 1600 Rpm or less in the upper 4 gears, and then accelerated, generally on a mild uphill section of road. It was merely an observation, and certainly not enough to warrant not using 87 Octane.
 

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Having just pounded out 2000 miles of vacation through the mountains of Tn, Va, Wv, and Pa, I can say that for most driving, I felt no difference, BUT, when enjoying leisurely cruising through the Smoky Mtn Nat'l Park, and along the Blue Ridge Pkwy, there is a low RPM throttle input delay when running 87 Octane, that I no longer felt when running 93 Octane.


To duplicate the delay, the engine had to be at 1600 Rpm or less in the upper 4 gears, and then accelerated, generally on a mild uphill section of road. It was merely an observation, and certainly not enough to warrant not using 87 Octane.
Having just pounded out 2000 miles of vacation through the mountains of Tn, Va, Wv, and Pa, I can say that for most driving, I felt no difference, BUT, when enjoying leisurely cruising through the Smoky Mtn Nat'l Park, and along the Blue Ridge Pkwy, there is a low RPM throttle input delay when running 87 Octane, that I no longer felt when running 93 Octane.


To duplicate the delay, the engine had to be at 1600 Rpm or less in the upper 4 gears, and then accelerated, generally on a mild uphill section of road. It was merely an observation, and certainly not enough to warrant not using 87 Octane.
The problem you describe was most likely due to high elevation! Nothing to do with the fuel octane.
 
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