Hyundai Genesis Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Take 'em Fei!
Joined
·
9,280 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Alrightly, thought I would post a DIY on performing an Oil Change on the 2010 Genesis Coupe 3.8 V6.

You will need the following tools:

1) 8000 lbs Wheel Ramps - $39.99 from local Autozone.
2) Wheel Chalks (I use plastic Rhino Chalks) - $3 to $5 from Walmart
3) Oil Drain Pan - $3 to $5 from Walmart
4) Oil Fluid Funnel - $1 from Walmart
5) Oil Storage Container - $5 to $10 from Walmart
6) Hyundai Oil Filter (P/N 26320 3C30A) - $7 to $11 from local Hyundai Dealer
7) 6 Qts of any Oil of your choice that meets the viscosity grade stated in the owners manual, typically 5W-20 or 5w-30 (I used AMSOil Full Synthetic 5W-30) - $25 to $50
8) Pair of Mechanics gloves (optional) - $10 from Walmart
9) Deep well 10 mm socket wrench
10) Deep well 17 mm socket wrench
11) Standard well 27 mm socket wrench
12) Standard #2 flat head screw driver
13) A shop rag









Okay. Let's get started!

First, you need to carefully place your wheel ramps on a flat surface and proceed to slowly pull your car onto the ramps. It is helpful if you have a second person here to align and guide you on the ramps, but is not necessary.



Second, be sure to place the car into 1st gear for manuals or park as well as pull the emergency brake to lock the front wheels. Finally, place your wheel chalks behind the rear wheels and make sure they are pushed firmly behind the rear tires. Your car is not secure and shouldn't move. This is important as you don't want your car to magically roll away while your under it for a number of safety reasons.

Third, you are now ready to get started on the draining oil phase. You will need to first remove the plastic under cowling from the car. You could leave the front cowling and just remove the larger rear cowling, but I like to remove both so that while I am down under the car I can do a quick examination of the underside of the car to be sure nothing looks worn or out of the ordinary. Using your 10 mm deep socket wrench, remove the bolts holding the cowling. Be careful when you get down to the last 2 bolts as the plastic cowling will fall on your face if you do not hold it up while removing the last screws.









Forth, locate the black aluminum oil pan located centered in between the two black frame mounts for the above drivetrain components and in front of the front axel and suspension components. Centered on the back side (towards the transmission side) of the oil pan is the oil drain plug. Using your 17 mm deep well socket wrench and a bit of force, pop the hold of the bolt until it will freely turn with your fingers. At this point, to minimize mess and clean up, remove the wrench and place the oil catch drain pan on the ground with the front lip of the circular oil drain pan just a hair towards the front to cover dripping when the oil is almost completely drained directly under the drain plug.

Using your fingers, slowly and carefully loosen the drain plug until you can see oil start to leak out. At this point double check your oil drain pan placement as you don't want to spill any oil (both environmentally bad and stains causing a pain in the butt cleanup). Now, quickly remove the drain plug and your hand from the oil stream and watch as the oil begins to drain. You should now give the drain process about 5 to 10 minutes to completely drain into the oil drain pan.









Fifth, when the oil has completely finished draining and only rarely drips, it is now time to remove the oil filter. The oil filter is located towards the front left of the oil pan looking at the underside of the car from the front bumper. You will need your 27 mm standard socket wrench. Using the wrench and little bit of force, the filter should come loose. At this point, reposition the oil drain pan directly under the oil filter assembly. The oil in the drain pan has a tendency to wash over so be careful to gently move the pan over.

Once in place, using your hands loosen the oil filter element slowly until you start to see a small, but steady flow of oil from the filter assembly. The filter will still be installed in the car at this point. Again, allow about 5 minutes to pass as the oil drains until there is no stream of oil coming out any more. Once this has occurred, using your hands slowly and carefully remove the oil filter assembly.



Now, over a shop rag, examine the oil filter assembly. Grab the top of the oil filter itself and slowly turn it counter-clockwise until you feel it "click" at which time you use a bit of force to pull the filter out. On the thread of the filter assembly as shown in the picture above, locate about halfway down the rubber O-Ring. Using your standard #2 flat head screw driver, gently pry underneath the O-Ring and pull it out enough to allow it to be removed from the oil filter cap. Now, locate the new O-Ring from your oil fitler kit and reverse the process to place the new O-Ring onto the oil filter cap. After that, grab your new oil filter and with the side with the yellow writing facing upward towards you to where you could read it, place the new filter into the oil filter cap and press firmly to seat the filter (you will feel it "pop" into place) and then twist clockwise about 1/2 a turn to make sure it is fully seated.





 

·
Take 'em Fei!
Joined
·
9,280 Posts
Now that the new filter is ready to go, go back to your car and follow the above steps in reverse to reattach the filter to the car. *NOTE* once you get the filter hand tight, it will only need another 1/4 to 1/2 clockwise turn to the right to finish tightening the filter cap on. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN as this can damage the O-Ring seal and lead to leaks from premature failure. Once the filter is properly reinstalled. Completely remove the oil drain pan from underneath the car.

Next, locate your oil drain plug that you put aside and examine it. In the threading like the oil filter cap, there should be another rubber O-Ring. Like before, using your flat head screw driver gently pry off the old ring. Now locate the new O-Ring from your oil filter kit and install it onto your oil drain plug like you did with the oil filter cap. Once this is done, you may now reinstall the oil plug on the oil pan. Follow the same steps as above to hand tighten, the carefully finish off tightening the plug with your wrench. AGAIN - DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN to prevent damage to the O-Ring causing a possible premature failure and oil leakage.

Once the oil drain plug and filter are both re-secured, now look at the top of your engine. At the bottom right corner you will see the oil filler cap. Turning it counter-clockwise to remove it (I set it aside on the fuse box to the right). Now, get your 6 Qts of oil and your oil filling funnel. Place the funnel in the oil filler cap opening and carefully pour the first 5 Qts in completely. Be careful not to fill to quickly as depending on the nose to your funnel, the oil could backup and overflow on you causing a big mess to clean up.

Once you have the first 5 Qts in, carefully pour about 1/2 of the final 6th Qt bottle into the funnel as well. Now, check the oil dipstick located at the bottom and to the left of the engine. Pull it and wipe it off with your shop rag, reinsert it, and then remove it and examine the oil fluid level shown. You will probably be around 1/2 way between the L and the F. The Key here is to continue to carefully fill it until your get about 3/4 full according to the dip stick as you want as much oil as possible without going over the F level. I found that after pouring another 1/4 of the oil in, I reached about 3/4 level on the dipstick. Remember, each time you want to check the oil level on the dip stick, you should remove the dip stick, wipe it with your shop rag, reinsert it, and then remove it and check the level on the second removal.

Once the level of oil is correct, replace the oil dip stick and oil filler cap. The cap will turn clockwise until you hear it click indicating it is completely tight (similar sound and feel to your gas cap when you fill your car with fuel). At this point, secure the cap on the unused oil and set it aside. Proceed to get into your car and start it. Let it run for 2 or 3 minutes. As it is running for these few minutes, check underneath for any leaks from your oil plug and oil filter assembly to be sure they are tightened enough. Also verify the engine is not making any odd sounds or noises not noticed before. Finally, at the end of the 2 to 3 minutes, verify the oil temp is properly starting to rise like normal. BE CAREFUL RUNNING YOUR CAR IN ENCLOSED AREAS! I performed my oil change in my garage but leave the doors open. You do not want to choke yourself on your exhaust fumes. If everything looks good, turn the car off.

Finally, follow the above steps in reverse order to resecure your bottom plastic cowlings. Once done, remove the wheel chalks from your back wheels and slowly and carefully back off your ramps to where the car is flat on the level surface. Double check your dip stick again to verify the level looks good with your car now level and flat with the floor and not on an incline. If needed, add a bit more oil to get it to that 3/4 to F sweet spot on the dip stick. If everything still looks good, you now are finished with your oil change.

Be sure to place your used oil filter and rubber O-Rings along with carefully pouring your used oil into the carrying storage container to be taken to a local mechanic shop to be properly disposed of. NEVER POUR OIL DOWN A DRAIN OR ONTO GRASS OR DIRT! Oil damages the environment and is toxic to animal both wild and domestic (pets). Most shops will charge you a small fee, typically $5 or less to dispose of the oil. I personally have a good relationship with my local mechanic and because I do all my major services with him, he takes my old car fluids and disposes of them for free for me. Additionally, check your local work area and be sure to clean up any oil spills you find. If small, I use the shop rag and a little water to wipe up. If the spill is bigger, the best bet is to use an absorbent agent such as Cat liter to absorb and clump up the majority of the oil and sweep into a plastic bag to be throw away.

Congratulations! Your Gen Coupe now loves you more and you love your car more because she should be more peppy for having a fresh layer of oil to coat the old gears, pistons, etc. The first time you do an oil change yourself, especially if it is your first ever (like this one is for me), it will probably take about 1 hour to do. After that, additional changes will drop in time as you now know what to do and do not need to reference the guide as much or at all anymore. If you have any questions about the above DIY, please post or PM me and I will try my best to help you. Additionally, you can register for free at HMA Service to get a more overview step by step process of the above DIY along with schematic type diagrams for additional help if needed. Thanks.

Bill
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top