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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone on here running an aluminum driveshaft. Can I have your impressions/ feedback. That's going to be my next mod. I want to get rid of these rubber flex discs and hardware ect
 

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Anyone on here running an aluminum driveshaft. Can I have your impressions/ feedback. That's going to be my next mod. I want to get rid of these rubber flex discs and hardware ect
Is your car a daily?
I really wouldn't make your whole driveline solid. The bushings and guibos absorb a lot of vibration, shock and noise. Plenty of higher power cars use rubber guibo couplers.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Anyone on here running an aluminum driveshaft. Can I have your impressions/ feedback. That's going to be my next mod. I want to get rid of these rubber flex discs and hardware ect
Is your car a daily?
I really wouldn't make your whole driveline solid. The bushings and guibos absorb a lot of vibration, shock and noise. Plenty of higher power cars use rubber guibo couplers.
...I run it 6 months of the year and only on nice days. Just a play toy for the summer really
 

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In Charge of Snacks
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The solid driveshaft actually improves the driveability and comfort of this car. Many have said as much and I can confirm it. The giubos and carrier bearing isolator add to the rubber band lurchiness. It is possible that a solid driveshaft will accelerate mechanical wear at the trans/diff, though. Also, I would recommend the carbon as opposed to the aluminum. The aluminum won't absorb shock as well and as such will be louder and less smooth. However, the carbon is twice the price and more susceptible to impact damage and heat fatigue(You would be wise to heat wrap or thermal coat your exhaust where directly exposed to the shaft, especially catalysts). Both options will however be extremely overbuilt for normal cars. Very few of us will ever need 1000hp capabilities. Moreover, the carbon option isn't much lighter at all than the stock piece, and the one awaiting install in my garage right now is no smaller in diameter than the Aluminum unit, which is the main reason I chose it. I have to modify my custom exhaust to fit it, so that's a concern.

So,... caveat emptor and all that, but it's certainly a beneficial mod.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
How about torque lash? I had a genny owner mention he is running a cf unit and had bad torque lash when shifting?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The solid driveshaft actually improves the driveability and comfort of this car. Many have said as much and I can confirm it. The giubos and carrier bearing isolator add to the rubber band lurchiness. It is possible that a solid driveshaft will accelerate mechanical wear at the trans/diff, though. Also, I would recommend the carbon as opposed to the aluminum. The aluminum won't absorb shock as well and as such will be louder and less smooth. However, the carbon is twice the price and more susceptible to impact damage and heat fatigue(You would be wise to heat wrap or thermal coat your exhaust where directly exposed to the shaft, especially catalysts). Both options will however be extremely overbuilt for normal cars. Very few of us will ever need 1000hp capabilities. Moreover, the carbon option isn't much lighter at all than the stock piece, and the one awaiting install in my garage right now is no smaller in diameter than the Aluminum unit, which is the main reason I chose it. I have to modify my custom exhaust to fit it, so that's a concern.

So,... caveat emptor and all that, but it's certainly a beneficial mod.
The only concern I would have with an aluminum or CF unit is the same concern i have with the stock shaft. The clearance between the magnaflow resonator and the shaft . Way too tight. If I swap out the shaft I would do a resonator delete.
 

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The solid driveshaft actually improves the driveability and comfort of this car. Many have said as much and I can confirm it. The giubos and carrier bearing isolator add to the rubber band lurchiness. It is possible that a solid driveshaft will accelerate mechanical wear at the trans/diff, though. Also, I would recommend the carbon as opposed to the aluminum. The aluminum won't absorb shock as well and as such will be louder and less smooth. However, the carbon is twice the price and more susceptible to impact damage and heat fatigue(You would be wise to heat wrap or thermal coat your exhaust where directly exposed to the shaft, especially catalysts). Both options will however be extremely overbuilt for normal cars. Very few of us will ever need 1000hp capabilities. Moreover, the carbon option isn't much lighter at all than the stock piece, and the one awaiting install in my garage right now is no smaller in diameter than the Aluminum unit, which is the main reason I chose it. I have to modify my custom exhaust to fit it, so that's a concern.

So,... caveat emptor and all that, but it's certainly a beneficial mod.
To add, it reduces vibration into the chassis, because it eliminated the center bearing, that bolts to the chassis.

My assumption of why this setup is common is, it makes it easier to remove the transmission.

Don't use a solid metal guibo disc thingies. Others have tried and ran into all sorts of vibration issues, it's suppose to be flexible for a reason.
If anything, try to find a way to adapt some sort of u-joint setup.


About CF in general, there are fiberglass that are stringer than CF per weight/vol but fiberglass tends to do a thing where it likes to expand/contract, due to temps.
This is why you never get anything structural, that is advertised as CF but has a fiberglass core (ehem... hoods. I know it's not structural, but it's a common part where you'll find it). The fiberglass breaks the cf strands and piece loses it's "CF" structural benefits.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Would I like a cf unit? Yes...will i get one? Probaly not..$2200 Canadian for a driveshaft is a bit pricey for me. The aluminum piece is more obtainable. Even on a basically stock 3.8 will I notice improved throttle response/ quicker revving?
 

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How about torque lash? I had a genny owner mention he is running a cf unit and had bad torque lash when shifting?
I dont have one, so I cant give you a true account based on experience. I do know that the whole reason for the above advertised CF unit is strength in high hp applications. Good to 1000 hp.

I plan on this addition when I pull my existing 3.8 engine at 80,000 miles and forge/ 50 psi sleeves blah blah sex !, Gen 2 6266 pushing 32 psi. Any other shaft would snap with that kind of juice going through her.
(With serious upgrades to rear subframe and urethane bushings too).

Level 10 rebuild on the ZF,...no torque converter. 6K.
 

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I dont have one, so I cant give you a true account based on experience. I do know that the whole reason for the above advertised CF unit is strength in high hp applications. Good to 1000 hp.

I plan on this addition when I pull my existing 3.8 engine at 80,000 miles and forge/ 50 psi sleeves blah blah sex !, Gen 2 6266 pushing 32 psi. Any other shaft would snap with that kind of juice going through her.
(With serious upgrades to rear subframe and urethane bushings too).

Level 10 rebuild on the ZF,...no torque converter. 6K.
You could build a steel shaft to handle it, but why when beautiful off-the-shelf solutions exist? LOL, too bad DSS customer service/response and delivery times are abysmal...

The only concern I would have with an aluminum or CF unit is the same concern i have with the stock shaft. The clearance between the magnaflow resonator and the shaft . Way too tight. If I swap out the shaft I would do a resonator delete.
As I mentioned before, this thing is huge. It's advertised as 3.75" diameter, which would already be cutting it super close. I measured mine a 3.95". You'll need to mod your exhaust most likely. Not to mention the Aluminum unit is advertised at 4.25" diameter. Either way, you'll need changes. I'd say plan on it.

Would I like a cf unit? Yes...will i get one? Probaly not..$2200 Canadian for a driveshaft is a bit pricey for me. The aluminum piece is more obtainable. Even on a basically stock 3.8 will I notice improved throttle response/ quicker revving?
Also as mentioned above, the unit has near equal mass to the stock assembly. On top of that, being so much bigger in diameter, it likely has an even greater moment of inertia than stock. However, given that it eliminates the giubos, kills the angle of the center bearing, and makes use of a fancy high spec CV joint, I'd say it will consume far less energy at high speeds than the stock assembly. Will that mean better launches? Not within human perception, no. But it will result in less wear, better fuel economy, and better power in the upper rev ranges.

How about torque lash? I had a genny owner mention he is running a cf unit and had bad torque lash when shifting?
I had horrible lash with my completely stock setup which I just swapped out. New diff took a little more than half of the lash out of the system. Look, gears wear out, they'll need to be adjusted/replaced eventually. It's just a matter of time/miles/stress.

To add, it reduces vibration into the chassis, because it eliminated the center bearing, that bolts to the chassis.

My assumption of why this setup is common is, it makes it easier to remove the transmission.

Don't use a solid metal guibo disc thingies. Others have tried and ran into all sorts of vibration issues, it's suppose to be flexible for a reason.
If anything, try to find a way to adapt some sort of u-joint setup.


About CF in general, there are fiberglass that are stringer than CF per weight/vol but fiberglass tends to do a thing where it likes to expand/contract, due to temps.
This is why you never get anything structural, that is advertised as CF but has a fiberglass core (ehem... hoods. I know it's not structural, but it's a common part where you'll find it). The fiberglass breaks the cf strands and piece loses it's "CF" structural benefits.
Dude, even solid giubos with urethane isolation bushings wreck your car. It's a terrible idea at anything beyond 1/2 a degree of deflection. Stock giubos or get rid of them all together.

On the transmission idea, huh... I never thought of that. It does make a lot of sense. Especially in the age of no-dipstick transmissions. So cynical these OEMs. lol

And for $1,400.00 DSS had better not be selling us carbon wrapped fiberglass cores.
 

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(Dude, even solid giubos with urethane isolation bushings wreck your car. It's a terrible idea at anything beyond 1/2 a degree of deflection. Stock giubos or get rid of them all together. )


Really,...wow. Maybe I'll purchase a oem rubber oneand cast my own high strength casting? solid urethane, or maybe layered as in 75D over 80 A over 75D over 80A.....That would be strong as F--K but give great dampening.. I cant see how the stock would last at all.

Well i have time to ponder this and ask around.
 

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(Dude, even solid giubos with urethane isolation bushings wreck your car. It's a terrible idea at anything beyond 1/2 a degree of deflection. Stock giubos or get rid of them all together. )


Really,...wow. Maybe I'll purchase a oem rubber oneand cast my own high strength casting? solid urethane, or maybe layered as in 75D over 80 A over 75D over 80A.....That would be strong as F--K but give great dampening.. I cant see how the stock would last at all.

Well i have time to ponder this and ask around.
Before you do that look at the construction of the stock giubos. They aren't just rubber. The casting and inserts are interwoven with some type of cable. either synthetic or metal. I don't think ANY simple rubber or urethane would hold up to what they endure. They need to be reinforced. Maybe chopped carbon fiber in a poly-urea would be strong enough? IDK
 

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This will give you and idea of what is inside a guibo.



A failure like this is pretty rare from my understanding.


according to dorman, the same part on the BK is the same one that BMW uses.

I would look up what the high HP BMWs are using, if they are using a specific part number, some sort of conversion to u-joints, or something else.
 
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