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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey everyone!

I think many of you are probably familiar with me and my posts. It's been almost exactly one year since I bought my 2015 3.8 Ultimate Gen Coupe. It's been an amazing year of modding. But what makes it amazing to me, is that I've learned so much (through the help of a great community) and have been able to do all of my mods myself. This is a great feat to me, considering I didn't know jack about cars a year ago, besides driving them. I couldn't have done it with out putting in a ton of hard work.

This post isn't so much as an introduction, but rather a reflection of my first year in car modding and sharing my ideas and perceptions with any new future modder / enthusiast.

A little about me

I bought my Genesis Coupe in December of 2014. I've wanted a Genesis Coupe the first year they came out. Before I wanted a Gen Coupe, I checked out the Tiburon and thought they were super cool looking, but didn't like how little power they had. And at that time, the idea of modding a car for more power, didn't even cross my mind. That was something that "crazy engineer people" do. So I bought a v6 Sonata. Lots of space and packs a solid punch for a sedan.

For the first time in my life, I felt like I could afford a Genesis Coupe (all in, insurance and everything, not just core cost), so I did it. And this has absolutely been the best experience I've ever had with owning and driving a car. The closest experiences I'd had with modding, were my Subaru buddies who were always doing crazy things to their cars making them super fast and fun. And I can still remember the comments from my best friend who is a subie guy "Dude, don't buy a Hyundai 'sports' car. It's gonna be a piece of crap and you're just gonna be frustrated modding stuff when it falls apart". Boy was he wrong. But there is still time to blow my engine yet ;P.

I decided that as amazingly powerful as the 3.8 is stock, I wanted more power! I LOVED this car. It's the most powerful car I've ever owned before, but I really wanted to get into modding. So this started my journey a year ago.

I'm sure some of you can relate.

Side note; Vacmurse, pronounced "vah-sh moo-er seh" is actually Lojban for the dusk time of day. Lojban is a man made language which I was learning for a few months out of personal linguistical interests. Or you can just call me vacuum, lol.

So how'd ya do it all?

My mindset is / was:

If I'm gonna do anything worthwhile and great with my car, it's gonna require building a network of support with good people that will help me learn and attain my goals. I don't already know this stuff, so I'm gonna have to figure it out. So for new modders and enthusiasts, the most important things I can suggest:

• Read. Read. Read more. You have to want to learn. Modding is not a sport for "just tell me what to do" people. Love it or get the eff out.
• Do due diligence. On every forum on the planet, you have guys that post things and response that look like "just search jerkwad". I cannot stress enough that it's important to really try and build a foundation of knowledge on your own (even if it's 5 minutes of google searching before you give up!). Because it affects the following greatly.....
• Make friends with everyone you can. I've found that *most* people really appreciate someone who is struggling to find the answer, but has really given it their best shot before hand. Most people have egos that love to be able to be "the guy with the answer" (GCG /cough). But in order to get on their good side, you have to be self motivated. This means that when you post, do the following:

o Show what you've figured out on your own. Explain your own knowledge on the subject. This gives the reader the ability to know where you're coming from and correct any incorrect assumptions you already have.
o Use proper grammar and don't be lazy. I shouldn't even have to say this, but so many people don't get it.
o Contribute back into the community! Don't be a leach! Nothing makes other people want to help you more than seeing you really try to help each other. This is the exact reason why I started the "Idiot's guide" posts. Yes, I enjoy teaching other people. But it's really about being a strong community. Also on a side note, when you teach other people something, it really forces you to know what you're talking about and gives you more opportunity to learn. For Example, in my first guide on installing the r2c CAI, I thought the BK2 had a MAF sensor, but I was corrected by another member and told that it was an IAT / BPS. Learning opportunity. If I'd just kept my install knowledge to myself, I'd not have learned this detail so quickly.

• Don't take things personally. Some people are insensitive and jerky. Let it roll off your back. Fun fact, I think I've only had one person on this forum talk **** to me. Out of all my interactions, that's pretty damn good. And I believe earnestly, that's it's because of what I've mentioned above.

So, as is with all my guides, there are things that I wish I'd known right off the bat, that could have helped my learning. So I'm going to put them here, all whilst attempting to not be redundant of GCG's excellent newbie guide.

My personal tips for a happy life

• Read GCG's newbie guide. I've read it from front to back like 5 times already.
http://www.gencoupe.com/new-member-section/216521-ultimate-genesis-coupe-newbie-guide-modding-must-read.html

• When all else fails, hit up GCG's no troll thread. Follow my guidelines above and you'll find that that thread is heavenly gold. But still search first ;)
http://www.gencoupe.com/new-member-section/310649-ask-geek-no-troll-zone.html

• Pictures are worth a 1000 words. Learn how to post them. For some reason, not all threads allow uploading pictures directly.
http://www.gencoupe.com/new-member-section/29713-how-post-pictures.html

• Share in the excitement of daily mod updates. Contribute to:
http://www.gencoupe.com/general-discussion/82963-what-did-you-do-your-genesis-coupe-today.html

Interestingly enough, most of these are sticky threads in the newb section ;P.

Random data that I wish I knew up front

• When things go wrong on your car, they go wrong for a reason. It's not mystical. God doesn't hate you. There aren't gnomes in your engine bay. So take a breath and figure it out, one step at a time.

• When bad things happen related to the power train (engine / transmission) or most aspect of the car, a CEL is thrown. This is the "check engine light". Besides just being an ominous light, there is an error code and value associated with that light. If you get one, before asking about it, go get an "ODB2 reader". I bought my first one from Walmart in a pinch. It was like $90 and sucks. You can get a bluetooth ODB2 adapter and sync up your phone / tablet with the "torque" app (or others) for much less and it's a lot better of an interface to use. Having this code is a MUST to figure out what went wrong.

Also, if you stop at most auto parts stores (leave your engine running), they will mostly likely read your code for free and tell you what it is.

NOTE: A flashing CEL is BAD NEWS and you need to let off the throttle and pull over immediately. I've only seen this twice and each time it was do to a bad tune causing my engine to misfire. Misfires are BAD. Luckily, this was a rare condition that I figured out how to stay out of. It could be something far worse.

• There are different types of codes. Some codes can be cleared. Some cannot. Some clear themselves over time or when the car is turned off.

• There are multiple computers in the car, beyond just the "ECU". Sometimes you have to have Hyundai service read or clear your codes, using a special system called GDS. I don't really know much more beyond that.

• When your car has something bad happen to it, it will commonly go into "limp mode". This feels like the car is still running, but your gas pedal just stops working. This is a safety mode that the car goes into that allows you to still drive it (albeit slowly), so you can "limp" home. I thought I completely broke my car the first time this happened. If you hit limp mode, you'll have a CEL. GET A READER DAMMIT :)

• Read this to better understand how cars work. When you understand the machine, it becomes less majickal and simply just like any other machine that you need to troubleshoot. How cars work PDF

• Join Facebook groups. Seriously. If you don't "do facebook" start. Genesis Coupe Owners is a catch all and is filled with immature stupid ****. Join it, but I don't post much there. Join local groups and introduce yourself. I'm part of several Texas groups. I've made several really good friends this way (yes, as in real friends that we talk regularly and help each other out in our modding and what not). Friends with Gen Coupes are great. But again, don't expect that much greatness out of the GCO page :p

• When you mod, you do NOT void your warranty. You only "void" making claims on parts you've touched. For example, I have the bumper to bumper 100k warranty. I've added a turbo. If my CD player dies, you better damn be sure that they're replacing it. If cylinder 6 has crap for compression and my engine bay is smoking, they're gonna tell me to take a hike.

• On that note: Make friends with your local service manager. Be honest with them. Find out how they feel about mods. Share with them your goals, if you feel they are decent people. From day one, I got to know the service manager and told him "I have great plans for this car and modding. But I will be reasonable with you and I hope you'll be reasonable back". I stop by after doing a mod and show it to them. Like after I bored out my throttle body, I said "Joe! Check this out. Increased the bore on the TB. I'll never ask you for warranty repairs on my TB". Have some integrity. Don't try to get Hyundai to cover damage that you did. That said, tuning is a touchy subject. Don't tell the dealer you had SFR / BTR tune your car, because they are super scared of "tunes". Now in my personal opinion, I think my SFR tune actually made the car run better in a lot of ways, but they don't necessarily see it that way. I monitored AFRs closely and can say with my own personal integrity intact, that if my engine blew, it's likely not because of the SFR tune. But that's still the line you walk when you mod. Just don't be a sheister.

• Read the Service Manuals for the car. HOLY COW! I didn't know these existed for months after getting into this car. You can find them here:
http://www.gencoupe.com/diy-do-yourself/212585-snoopy-s-bookshelf.html

These manuals go over so many procedures. I've figured out how to take off bumpers, remove my surge tank, and all sorts of stuff. Without having to bug other people. The docs aren't very hi resolution and they can be confusing, but it's a GREAT place to start. I sometimes just read random sections of the service manual, in order to better understand the various systems in my car. Use this resource!!!

• There is also a website where you can access this data and search, but it requires a paid membership. I don't know why I haven't purchased the membership yet. Probably because I've been able to ask a friend who has a subscription, questions about what I need and he shares the info with me. But it's a really good resource as well.

https://www.hyundaitechinfo.com/

• I recently added a turbo to my car via TurboKits.com (one of the site vendors). TK is AMAZING and Jesse has my business for life. Great people. But when I first started looking into forced induction, I really didn't understand jack about it and I asked some pretty dumb questions. It was recommended to me to read the following book, and I recommend you do, because it helped clarify soooooo much about boost:

Maximum Boost: Designing, Testing and Installing Turbocharger Systems (Engineering and Performance)
by Corky Bell (Author)

If you are interested in turboing your v6 Gen, or have a 2.0T, just buy this book and read it. It's a fantastic read. I did skim over some sections, especially having to do with the mathematics behind it. But the book changed my life :D

• Expect to buy a crap ton of tools. The modding parts are only part of the game. I end up buying tools like every other week. It's crazy. But it's also fun.

• If you are scared of modding, good. But once your car is modded and working well, there is a huge sense of accomplishment, like none other. The first time someone pulls up next to you, rolls down there windows and says "holy damn! That car is hot!", it makes it all worth it. :)

• If you don't have a backup car, you're freakin nuts. Modding is serious stuff. I've had my Gen Coupe down for periods at a time. My Gen is my DD, but I still have a backup car. I'd highly recommend having a backup car, even if it's a beater.

Conclusion

I hope this helps some people. I'll add to it if I can think of anything else. Happy modding and stay safe! Hope to see you guys at the Dragon!
 

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This is awesome, and I agree 100% with all of the points you made. I've lurked and been a member on here for over 3 years and understood pretty quickly from the start how important it is to try to educate yourself first before asking questions instead of just looking for an easy handout. I was new to modding when I bought my coupe a few years ago and my automotive interest actually ended up leading to a career in the auto repair trade.
It's such a rewarding feeling knowing I've done all the work/maintenance on my car and it's great to see other people taking on the challenges and experience themselves!

You've definetly done impressive things with your Genny, can't wait to see what else is in store! :thumbup:
 

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How does your subaru buddies feel about your POS Hyundai sports car?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
How does your subaru buddies feel about your POS Hyundai sports car?

He thinks it's cool, but there is no winning with subie dudes when you don't have awd ;) I'd need to at least have an evo to be taken seriously. Hehe.

He told me that I'm not allowed to crash it before he has a chance to drive it, though :D

Also, I have the 8AT, so I don't get no love in general.
 

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Discussion Starter #6

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Well, 8 spd auto is more reliable for boost and keeps boost up beeter at shifts. Then again I thought it was too boring, but it fits well people with disabilities... :)
 

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Side note; Vacmurse, pronounced "vah-sh moo-er seh" is actually Lojban for the dusk time of day. Lojban is a man made language which I was learning for a few months out of personal linguistical interests. Or you can just call me vacuum, lol.
Also, I was wondering the story behind your username but I always pictured it as Vac-Murse, or vacuum-murse:

 

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3point8 Performance
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Also, I was wondering the story behind your username but I always pictured it as Vac-Murse, or vacuum-murse:

LMFAO! That's how I pronounce it in my head and after trying for 5 minutes to pronounce it correctly as described, I'm still going to pronounce it as spelled :)

Awesome stuff man. I was fortunate enough to find a group of friends that knew cars and I learned a crap ton from them and they would help wrench on the camaro on the weekends. Spent 3 years working at a high performance transmission shop early on but combined I didn't learn nearly as much as when I stated modding the SRT4. Building a car is a lot different that modifying a car. Gotta get in there and do it, fix the lights and read read read.

Cannot be afraid to kill your car either. I killed my Cruze several times :grin:

I've said it once and I'll say it again, I'm proud of where you are today. You are a great example of what anyone can do if they just try. Cars are not mysterious. Women are far more mysterious than cars. When a car is mad at you, it'll let you know and tell you exactly what you did to screw up!
 

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Nice write-up man! Good stuff....
 
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