Hyundai Genesis Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
First thread! Anyway folks, I’ve shamed myself in seizing my 2013 3.8 Auto and I’m looking for the best and easiest replacement engine because these engines were discontinued and anywhere that has them are selling them for crazy amounts. The mechanic has explained it’s probably best that I find the same 3.8 GDi that’s in the coupe already but before I drop 3500+ on one of those is there anything else that would work just as good without lots of problems in the long run? I see that the sedan of the same year also has a 3.8, would this work in the coupe? Thanks for the help!
 

·
In Charge of Snacks
Joined
·
2,057 Posts
According to those that buy them, the Hyundai in house rebuilds are terrible. Have your engine rebuilt. Sleeve it. It will cost you a little more than the salvage engines and a ton less that a factory rebuild and it will be vastly superior to either. Yes it will take forever. I'm sorry. LOL
 

·
Bill
Joined
·
547 Posts
you could get a junkyard 13+ engine if you can find one.
sedan was set up differently.
if you want performance, Odie gave the best advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
What is specifically wrong with the engine?
I’m not too knowledgeable in motors but all the mechanic told me was that it was seized. I was running it at high RPMs with hardly any oil supposedly (which btw I never got any sensors letting me know of any issues) and then it started making a strange noise so we checked the oil and it was near dirt dry so we put more in just to get it to the shop and the shop said it was seized. Not really a shop that would know anything about this car but to their knowledge it’s seized.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
And forgot to mention that in the meantime between the shop the car just shut off and wouldn’t turn back on so had to have it towed. Anytime you tried starting it you would just hear a click.
 

·
Reader of many threads
Joined
·
1,424 Posts
Well if the starter can't crank it, the block is certainly seized. You won't know WHY or HOW it's seized until you pull the bottom end and heads off. Most garages work on the usual crap - belts, oil, hoses, bolt-on part replacements - they're not going to diagnose the internals of an engine. See if there is an engine shop nearby... they're more comfortable pulling the top and bottom end apart, generally won't over-estimate on hours and will give you a REAL answer on how much it'll take to recondition the block.

If you're lucky, it's a mildly spun bearing/journal somewhere, hasn't thrown a ton of metal into the oil, and just a few parts need to be replaced. If you're unlucky, you have cylinder wall damage and the block is rendered irreparable. Compared to the cost of a new engine, it's worth getting it properly diagnosed if you can save thousands on a PROPERLY DONE block rebuild.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,843 Posts
I’m not too knowledgeable in motors but all the mechanic told me was that it was seized. I was running it at high RPMs with hardly any oil supposedly (which btw I never got any sensors letting me know of any issues) and then it started making a strange noise so we checked the oil and it was near dirt dry so we put more in just to get it to the shop and the shop said it was seized. Not really a shop that would know anything about this car but to their knowledge it’s seized.
That's your problem. ALWAYS check your oil levels.
 

·
In Charge of Snacks
Joined
·
2,057 Posts
Bummer, I feel for you bud. Learn the lesson here and be sure to check your oil levels at every fuel fill up. That being said, these engines are becoming more and more valuable since the end of production. Somebody will rebuild it, it should be you. If you get it done yourself you'll have a far better engine than any available to you on the market. Luck in battle, friend!
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top