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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Okay. So recently I spun a rod bearing on my 2012 Genesis coupe 2.0T. I wanted to BK2 block swap it but couldn’t find any straight answers here so I’ll make a straight foward post for those of you who also have questions now that I have completed this swap.

I read on the forums from some That is a clean swap while others said the opposite. I also read that you will need to convert to a BK2 starter, clutch and trans and that if you keep your BK1 clutch it will make a metal grinding noise.

For starters BK2 swapping your car is very straight forward. Motors are nearly identical in terms of wiring. I pulled my blown BK1 motor out And from there swapped EVERYTHING over with almost no problems. Alternator, Water pump, AC compressor, manifold along with my Tomei turbo, motor mounts ect. What I did was to ensure everything would go smoothly I swapped my starter, trans, clutch AND my flywheel (BK1) to my new BK2 motor and now have 0 problem with clutch trans or starter problems. My MPX manifold was a direct fit to the BK2 block. From there everything was an easy plug in from my BK1 wire harness to my BK2 block. If you decide to swap I suggest staying with a BK1 ECU as the BK2 ECU is programmed for an electronic wastegate that comes on the OEM BK2 turbo. You WILL need a tune once this swap is done. Running your car untuned after a BK2 swap is unsafe and will run like garbage. As for oil, I suggest Rotella T6 5w-40 full synthetic oil.

Some people had problems making injectors compatible but it is simply common sense. A BK1 intake manifold will fit on a BK2 block. I run a ported and polished BK1 intake manifold on my motor, therefore I used my DW 750cc injectors on a BK1 injector rail. If you decide to use a BK2 intake manifold, you will need to clip your injectors to a BK2 injector rail. Simple stuff. As for the radiator, complete plug and play also. Once the swap was finished it did idol and cold start horribly but once you do a necessary tune it runs like a dream. Boosted my numbers from around 290whp to around 380whp simply with a BK2 motor swap and a tune on my turbo kit.

Edit: Just for extra information as said below by AKGC there is a compression difference between BK1 and BK2 motors. This compression difference is the reason I suggest to not drive your car until you are tuned as I did. Driving on a BK2 motor with a compression difference from the BK1 has been known to fry piston rings, bend connecting rods, stretch timing chains ect. Heavily suggest driving or running the car as little as possible until tuned and most certainly STAY out of boost until properly tuned for the swap.
Along with the compression difference I read from people on the forums that with the wrong starter you will have a metallic cling noise when starting your car but myself and my friend who also BK2 swapped his car has had no problems.

Have any questions or need help on the subject feel feee to contact me on Instagram @CarolinaCarCulture
 

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bk1 and bk2 starters are interchangeable. It's just that putting in a bk2 starter just doesn't involve having to undo the passenger side motor mount and jacking the engine up to put it in.

the injectors are ECU dependent, meaning using the wrong impedence injectors on the bk2 ecu is going to fry the ecu's injector circuit.

It will run like crap without a tune because the BK2 internals has like 0.3~0.4 less compression than the BK1 internals
(bk1 = 9.3ish:1)
(bk2 = 9.0:1)

I believe the cams have different profiles too
 

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Discussion Starter #3
bk1 and bk2 starters are interchangeable. It's just that putting in a bk2 starter just doesn't involve having to undo the passenger side motor mount and jacking the engine up to put it in.

the injectors are ECU dependent, meaning using the wrong impedence injectors on the bk2 ecu is going to fry the ecu's injector circuit.

It will run like crap without a tune because the BK2 internals has like 0.3~0.4 less compression than the BK1 internals
(bk1 = 9.3ish:1)
(bk2 = 9.0:1)

I believe the cams have different profiles too
I thought about including the difference in compressions I just felt it was irrelevant because my car was previously tuned with
bk1 and bk2 starters are interchangeable. It's just that putting in a bk2 starter just doesn't involve having to undo the passenger side motor mount and jacking the engine up to put it in.

the injectors are ECU dependent, meaning using the wrong impedence injectors on the bk2 ecu is going to fry the ecu's injector circuit.

It will run like crap without a tune because the BK2 internals has like 0.3~0.4 less compression than the BK1 internals
(bk1 = 9.3ish:1)
(bk2 = 9.0:1)

I believe the cams have different profiles too
I almost added the part about the compression difference in the post but decided not to, didn’t think it was significant enough but I just added my thoughts on that. I also did read about using the wrong injectors causing problems but I used a BK1 intake and used a BK1 rail and everything worked fine. My friend used a BK2 intake so he used stock BK2 rail and injectors and went well also.
Have you BK2 swapped also? Would love to hear more from you
 

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I thought about including the difference in compressions I just felt it was irrelevant because my car was previously tuned with


I almost added the part about the compression difference in the post but decided not to, didn’t think it was significant enough but I just added my thoughts on that. I also did read about using the wrong injectors causing problems but I used a BK1 intake and used a BK1 rail and everything worked fine. My friend used a BK2 intake so he used stock BK2 rail and injectors and went well also.
Have you BK2 swapped also? Would love to hear more from you
I've worked on both engines.

They are relatively the same.
physical dimensions of injectors are the same, it's the resistance of the injectors internal wiring is different (injectors are basically solenoids)

I haven't opened up a bk2 engine, but I believe the chamber designs are similar enough to not matter.
a 0.3~0.4 difference in compression on going from 9.3~9.4 to 9 compression is almost a 10% difference. It's going to matter.
That on a stock bk1 ecu/tune is going to run rough... though it may clear up some once the engine warms up, but it's going to run rich.

Reason why I said that the cams are probably different, is because of the turbo that it was originally designed for.

The BK1 engine that I'm half way to completing (life gets in the way)... I was originally going to go with 9:1 internals, but getting a proper tune, where I'm at, is going to be nearly impossible, and would involve me driving 10,0000+ miles to get to a shop willing to tune it. My original goal with rebuilding it, is to get rid of the trash oem conrods/pistons. My first engine blew up 2~3 years after owning it (#4 conrod snapped, just under the wrist pin). Thing only had like 10,000 miles on it.

I have a dynojet CMD on the car, but not connected. I only intend to use that for minor fuel adjustments, as the only way to tune spark timing is to get a proper tune, or get a haltech.

Engine #2 is in the car, engine #3 is the one I'm rebuilding.

The stock intake manifold design (both bk1 and bk2) is trash. It's prone to running the rear cylinders lean (them getting more air).
That with the fuel rail is a recipe for disasters if you run higher boost without running larger injectors.
it would have been easier to run the fuel inlet from the rear of the fuel rail. This would have compensated for the rear cylinders getting more air.

Lots of "why the hell did they do that?"
 

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Discussion Starter #5
G
I've worked on both engines.

They are relatively the same.
physical dimensions of injectors are the same, it's the resistance of the injectors internal wiring is different (injectors are basically solenoids)

I haven't opened up a bk2 engine, but I believe the chamber designs are similar enough to not matter.
a 0.3~0.4 difference in compression on going from 9.3~9.4 to 9 compression is almost a 10% difference. It's going to matter.
That on a stock bk1 ecu/tune is going to run rough... though it may clear up some once the engine warms up, but it's going to run rich.

Reason why I said that the cams are probably different, is because of the turbo that it was originally designed for.

The BK1 engine that I'm half way to completing (life gets in the way)... I was originally going to go with 9:1 internals, but getting a proper tune, where I'm at, is going to be nearly impossible, and would involve me driving 10,0000+ miles to get to a shop willing to tune it. My original goal with rebuilding it, is to get rid of the trash oem conrods/pistons. My first engine blew up 2~3 years after owning it (#4 conrod snapped, just under the wrist pin). Thing only had like 10,000 miles on it.

I have a dynojet CMD on the car, but not connected. I only intend to use that for minor fuel adjustments, as the only way to tune spark timing is to get a proper tune, or get a haltech.

Engine #2 is in the car, engine #3 is the one I'm rebuilding.

The stock intake manifold design (both bk1 and bk2) is trash. It's prone to running the rear cylinders lean (them getting more air).
That with the fuel rail is a recipe for disasters if you run higher boost without running larger injectors.
it would have been easier to run the fuel inlet from the rear of the fuel rail. This would have compensated for the rear cylinders getting more air.

Lots of "why the hell did they do that?"
What turbo and fuel system are you running? I run a Tomei M7960 with DW750cc at around 360whp (waiting for a dyno appointment) and I want to break into the 400s but I know I’ll need at least some fuel system mods to my BK1 fuel system
 

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Fuel pump.

Advertised HP is always higher than what you expect.
(Usually the mean HP @ like 25~30 psi)

with stock internals I wouldn't go any higher than 20~25 psi. With 9:1 maybe 25~30 psi

If you haven't changed out the guibos, I would do that, just as future assurance.


What "I" would do is

make a different intake manifold, with aux injectors for better idle. (I've been designing a manifold for like 6 years now)

Possible v-mount the radiator/intercooler to make the intercooler piping shorter.
 

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G

What turbo and fuel system are you running? I run a Tomei M7960 with DW750cc at around 360whp (waiting for a dyno appointment) and I want to break into the 400s but I know I’ll need at least some fuel system mods to my BK1 fuel system
Fuel return kit and methanol injection

Sent from my SM-G973U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Bk2 runs good with the bk1 ecu, just have to swap intake manifolds, cams are the same, the lower compression does make a bit of difference but is barely noticeable, the ecu adaptive will compensate for that after awhile.

Sent from my SM-G973U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Bk2 runs good with the bk1 ecu, just have to swap intake manifolds, cams are the same, the lower compression does make a bit of difference but is barely noticeable, the ecu adaptive will compensate for that after awhile.

Sent from my SM-G973U1 using Tapatalk
I’m very interested in doing meth, researching it right now. I mainly want it for cooling and extra rod knock safety. Since I’ve BK2 swapped With my turbo kit I’ve been running a little hot I’m just researching into what is the best route to go.
 

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Also your Mod list is veryyy interesting, very similar to mine and what I want to do I love it. Have you been dyno tested yet?
It's tuned by SFR, I wasn't chasing big numbers so we stopped at 20psi , it was having a hard time holding 20psi cause of the wastegate we believe, and it's an automatic, but it had nice power curve all the way to 7200 rpm, i think it was around 280 hp on the mustang dyno.

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Okay. So recently I spun a rod bearing on my 2012 Genesis coupe 2.0T. I wanted to BK2 block swap it but couldn’t find any straight answers here so I’ll make a straight foward post for those of you who also have questions now that I have completed this swap.

I read on the forums from some That is a clean swap while others said the opposite. I also read that you will need to convert to a BK2 starter, clutch and trans and that if you keep your BK1 clutch it will make a metal grinding noise.

For starters BK2 swapping your car is very straight forward. Motors are nearly identical in terms of wiring. I pulled my blown BK1 motor out And from there swapped EVERYTHING over with almost no problems. Alternator, Water pump, AC compressor, manifold along with my Tomei turbo, motor mounts ect. What I did was to ensure everything would go smoothly I swapped my starter, trans, clutch AND my flywheel (BK1) to my new BK2 motor and now have 0 problem with clutch trans or starter problems. My MPX manifold was a direct fit to the BK2 block. From there everything was an easy plug in from my BK1 wire harness to my BK2 block. If you decide to swap I suggest staying with a BK1 ECU as the BK2 ECU is programmed for an electronic wastegate that comes on the OEM BK2 turbo. You WILL need a tune once this swap is done. Running your car untuned after a BK2 swap is unsafe and will run like garbage. As for oil, I suggest Rotella T6 5w-40 full synthetic oil.

Some people had problems making injectors compatible but it is simply common sense. A BK1 intake manifold will fit on a BK2 block. I run a ported and polished BK1 intake manifold on my motor, therefore I used my DW 750cc injectors on a BK1 injector rail. If you decide to use a BK2 intake manifold, you will need to clip your injectors to a BK2 injector rail. Simple stuff. As for the radiator, complete plug and play also. Once the swap was finished it did idol and cold start horribly but once you do a necessary tune it runs like a dream. Boosted my numbers from around 290whp to around 380whp simply with a BK2 motor swap and a tune on my turbo kit.

Edit: Just for extra information as said below by AKGC there is a compression difference between BK1 and BK2 motors. This compression difference is the reason I suggest to not drive your car until you are tuned as I did. Driving on a BK2 motor with a compression difference from the BK1 has been known to fry piston rings, bend connecting rods, stretch timing chains ect. Heavily suggest driving or running the car as little as possible until tuned and most certainly STAY out of boost until properly tuned for the swap.
Along with the compression difference I read from people on the forums that with the wrong starter you will have a metallic cling noise when starting your car but myself and my friend who also BK2 swapped his car has had no problems.

Have any questions or need help on the subject feel feee to contact me on Instagram @CarolinaCarCulture
so I’m following a similar build. I’m goin with the tomei turbo as well. I wanted to know more about the intake, intercooler core and piping, and exhaust.

currently, I have an aem intake (bk1), stock bk1 core and injen intercooler piping, with a down pipe and then straight pipe after that. Did you have to upgrade your bk1 Intercooler piping to a bk2 fit? Also the same for the exhaust?

Ima newbie and just trying to learn the ropes!
 

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Everything from the BK1 fits with the BK2 but you should upgrade the intercooler core if going with a bigger turbo than stock.

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would an injen intercooler core be enough for the Tomei MX790
Get the biggest one you can fit

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