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Hi all - I got a check engine light and pulled engine code "P0080 - Powertrain Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit High (Bank 1)". It is on a 2010 3.8 Automatic with about 40k miles.

I was wondering if anyone else has run into this and can shed some light on how to fix it.

I started up from a cold start yesterday and the engine took an extra crank or two than normal to start IIRC, then once started had a brief second or two of rough idle before stabilizing. Then on my drive to work the engine power felt weaker than normal... as if I lost a cylinder (I guess this is what people refer to as limp mode?).

Had no engine light at this point.

Got out of work, started up from cold start once more and this time the engine light lit up.

Not sure if it is related but after arriving home the door gave me a bigger than usual static shock as I was getting out. Also my driver's side door handle lock/unlock button started intermittently failing just a couple weeks ago. Perhaps just a coincidence or a related electrical problem?

I did a quick inspection and the only thing out of the ordinary was what appears to be a couple oil drops on my fuse box and TB (or whatever that is) and have no idea how it could have gotten there. I do all my own maintenance and don't make messes like this, so it had to have happened from a leak while driving. I checked any connectors that I could find under the hood and made sure they were all connected... only 1 was ever so slightly loose.

Any help would be most appreciated!


UPDATE: Blimey! Just found some chewed wires right before the OCV. One of the 2 wires was chewed completely through and the other was damaged and they were shorted together. Time to do some soldering and get some mouse traps. Hopefully this was the extent of the damage. I'm convinced that those stains are mouse squirt now.

The fix was trivial - Expose the blue and pink wires from the loom, cut both wires flush on both ends, keeping as much length as possible. Next prep 2 new short segments of 16 gauge wire, slide on a piece of shrink tube to each wire and then solder in the new bridge wires. I joined the wire segments together by "fluffing" them up a bit at each end and then shoving them together "interlockingly" and then carefully compressed the joint together between 2 fingers. The wire joint should now hold well enough to solder. I would recommend you have or get some soldering skills before you delve in (youtube it). After that, use a lighter or heat gun (used both :sneaky:) to shrink the heat tube on to each individual wire. For extra credit, use electric tape and tape tightly over each individual wire over your shrink tube job. Next stuff the wires back into the existing loom (probably won't fit due to the patch job), so stuff in what you can and now remove all that 11 year old non-adhering factory tape and re-tape the loom end-to-end using electric tape. Clear your codes (I used a OBD2 bluetooth connector and Torque Pro App), and take it for a test drive. Yep, runs like new again.馃嵒

If mice are messing around under your hood: Clean any traces of them with soapy water and clorox wipes. Get some mint oil and lightly apply it to your wire harness, battery, hoses and anywhere they left a trace before cleaning. Recommend using a paint brush dipped in the oil for this. Be careful not to get the mint oil into the wire connector ends and DONT saturate the fabric wrapped wires (another post on this forum spilled oil on one and ended up in a proverbial world of kaka). Just like applying cologne. And do this every couple weeks in the cold months. Also think about setting mouse traps away from car, like near dumpsters, bbq grill, etc.


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Glad you found it. I had mice in my garage for a short time about 3, maybe 4 years ago. Took a couple mouse traps and some cheese to catch the three little gray suckers. No damage done to my cars that I ever noticed, so I got lucky. They did make a mess out of a box of shop rags and some cup of soup containers I had on a shelf. Didn't eat them empty, just chewed through the styrofoam and taste tested them for later, I guess.
 

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About six months after I bought my car I had a critter chew through some wires. I lost my A/C. I "used to" park in a nice corner spot next to a hedge at work. That cost me over $400 and I changed my parking space after that. My understanding is that the manufacturers are using a vegetable-based lubricant for the wiring. Thank the US EPA for that. Little animals are attracted to the lubricant as a potential food source. We keep mouse traps in our garages just in case. Glad you discovered it and fixed the problem.
 

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About six months after I bought my car I had a critter chew through some wires. I lost my A/C. I "used to" park in a nice corner spot next to a hedge at work. That cost me over $400 and I changed my parking space after that. My understanding is that the manufacturers are using a vegetable-based lubricant for the wiring. Thank the US EPA for that. Little animals are attracted to the lubricant as a potential food source. We keep mouse traps in our garages just in case. Glad you discovered it and fixed the problem.
Not the lube... its the insulation around the copper.
It's been argued thata the case and even lawsuits, but in the flip side. Rodenta teeth dont ever stop growing. So they chew on stuff to trim/wear them down. So they're just going to chew on random stuff.

Because of this, the best stuff to bate traps with, are nuts and peanut butter, not cheese.
 
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