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Team Sun*Works
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Discussion Starter #21
Thanks for all the help! Looks like its fixed, just took it for a pretty hard run and never got over 187. Must have still had an air bubble.
 

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A good way to help bleed your coolant system is to make sure the reservoir/radiator are the highest points in the system.

Just jack up the car from the front as high as it can go and gently massage your radiator hoses and heater hoses to help move air bubbles out.
 

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A good way to help bleed your coolant system is to make sure the reservoir/radiator are the highest points in the system.

Just jack up the car from the front as high as it can go and gently massage your radiator hoses and heater hoses to help move air bubbles out.
Not really sure if such a technique applies to these engines. Does work on the nissan KA24 :p
 

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Team Sun*Works
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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
I apreciate the heads up! By the way everything appears to be normal. I took it for even a harder drive last night and never broke into the 190's. :). As for my technique I disconnected the line on top of the powersteering pump (as suggested by Cody of LoveFab) and just kept adding until fluid started dribbling out of it, then I reconnected it and it's been fine since, oh and I added half a bottle of water wetter.

A good way to help bleed your coolant system is to make sure the reservoir/radiator are the highest points in the system.<br>
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Just jack up the car from the front as high as it can go and gently massage your radiator hoses and heater hoses to help move air bubbles out.
 

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found this thread last night. it saved me,

sitting at atm idling and engine temps creeped to 2 ticks below the red warning side!
radiator cap had popped loose and was boiling coolant out. filled with water at a near by gas station, let cool, did it again until completely full and just finished replacing all water today with 5.5qts of REAL coolant haha

thanks guys for the help without even trying. i guess this is what forums are for
 

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For most cooling systems, depending on your geographic location:

If in warmer climates, you can run a 70/30 mix (70% water, 30% coolant). The more water that is in the system, the cooler the operating temps will be while driving (this is FACT).

If in a colder climate, you can get away with a 60/40 mix.

If in an extremely cold climate (freezing temps), always do a 50/50 mix.

Also, when refilling the system, always use Distilled Water - not tap water. Tap water contains many minerals which can comprimise most vehicle cooling systems over time (ie: sludge and/or scale build up in radiator, heater core, etc). Distilled water can be purchased at most Dept. stores, such as WalMart, most auto parts stores and many grocery stores. Make sure the container says "distilled", NOT spring water.

As silly as it sounds, I've also found BMW Coolant to be one of the best factory coolants out there. This is the BMW "blue" coolant, which has properties in it that protects all aluminum parts from scaling/sludge and is far more "slippery" than any standard "green" coolant. I've used BMW coolant not only in my prior BMW's, but also all prior Mustangs, Broncos, Toyotas, etc - even still using it in my Cobra with absolutey no issues ever. You can buy the coolant at your local BMW Dealer OR most BMW vendors online.

Any type of "Water Wetters" will only work IF USED AS EXACTLY DESCRIBED ON THEIR LABELING. If you do not follow the manufacturer's exact instructions for when using any type of "water wetter" product, regardless of manufacturer, you're only wasting your money. Also, if you are in a region that experiences freezing temps, most water wetter products cannot be used and are not recommended.

~~~

Now, I did see another statement in this very thread about using a 160* thermostat... Other than it being a "colder" thermostat, why would any of you even want to consider a 160* thermostat? This was a "myth" way back in the day amongst many peformance communities (and performance magazines) that if using a 160* stat, this would keep the car running cooler - when the fact of the matter eventually came to be that using such a thermostat can actually harm the vehicle's performance and due to long term use, can also harm the rotating assembly.

If anything, I would not go any lower than a 180* stat in most vehicles today, including the GC and any other performance turbo'd, s/c'd or N/A V8, V6 or 4 cyl. There are absolutely no benefits from using a 160* thermostat.

If you also want to increase cooling efficiency:

1) installing a larger, more efficient radiator which will have the most benefit and be the best bang for the buck. Usually a 3 row radiator is the common upgrade over a standard factory single or double row radiator.

2) water pump - A) find a high efficiency "racing" water pump, which has better internal bearings and a better impeller or B) remove the mechanical water pump and install an electric water pump (this reduces drag on the engine & accessories and you would also run a shorter serpentine belt as well).

3) use more water than coolant only IF your geographic location does not go through a winter or freezing period
 

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I'd rather do it myself
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Water boils at 212F at 0 psi. At 18 psi it boils at 222F. A 50/50 mix of cheap green antifreeze boils at 225F at 0 psi and at 18 psi boils at ~270F. Which would you rather have under stress?

EDIT: or you could get some of this and forget about boiling over. http://www.evanscooling.com/coolants/
 
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