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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just swapped my 2012 3.8 grand touring 3.727 ratio open diff for a 4.181 open diff. And can I say.... damnnn! Some very noticeable gains. Still don't have tires that can with stand the power, that's coming next week or so. All in all, I'm very pleased with what I have now. I have no other performance mods at all besides a muffler delete and I've already beat a few Mustangs and other performance cars. Lost some too, but sometimes you win, sometimes you realize you need more power(or a lamborghini, go with the lamborghini). On a side note, if I weld my diff, is it similar to an LSD?
 

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So I just swapped my 2012 3.8 grand touring 3.727 ratio open diff for a 4.181 open diff. And can I say.... damnnn!
Those are some sick mechanical gains right there! Nothing gives instant quickness like a final drive swap.

Still don't have tires that can with stand the power, that's coming next week or so.
Noice. Are you sticking with those BFG Sport Comp 2's?

On a side note, if I weld my diff, is it similar to an LSD?
If you weld your diff it is similar to having a spool installed.



A spool simply locks the rear wheels together rigidly. This eliminates the possibility of spinning the power away through a single unloaded wheel, but also eliminates the possibility of any differential in speed between the rear wheels at all.

A welded diff will make your car pretty un-drivable on the street, at least for regular daily city driving. You would see vastly increased rear tire wear and the car would just handle like crap in general.

It's the sh*t for drifting though! >:D

If you want any kind of decent regular handling for grip driving and just daily driving in general, you will need a differential of some kind.

The Track Pack and Ultimate Edition Genesis Coupes came with a Torsen gear-type LSD. You can pick them up for reasonably cheap second-hand. The Torsen diff works well to bias drive torque towards whichever rear wheel has more grip. It isn't a 'locking' diff though, it need two firm contact patches to work, so when stationary, at lower speeds, or when a rear wheel lifts off the ground it can still spin power away through the wheel with less grip.



It isn't a huge deal for most drivers and in exchange for this downside in ultimate performance the Torsen LSD is extremely civilized. You can hardly notice it at all in regular driving.

It is possible to get both decent street manners and extreme locking diff action, you just have to acquire some expensive hardware. There are some seriously crazy after-market LSD options for the Genesis Coupe.

We went with a full clutch-type diff on Project Hoondy. Also known as a "Salisbury" LSD, these types of diffs are normally considered too obnoxious for street use because they tend to drag the inside wheel and just act like a welded diff in general.



We got around this problem by running low preload spring pressure, using some special lubricants, along with applying WPC treatment to the LSD's clutch plates and spacer rings:




It cost some good money, but it made for a smooth-driving street car that has tons of rear-axle grip and yet will also drift on command:


Good luck, happy tuning!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So I just swapped my 2012 3.8 grand touring 3.727 ratio open diff for a 4.181 open diff. And can I say.... damnnn!
Those are some sick mechanical gains right there! Nothing gives instant quickness like a final drive swap.

Still don't have tires that can with stand the power, that's coming next week or so.
Noice. Are you sticking with those BFG Sport Comp 2's?

On a side note, if I weld my diff, is it similar to an LSD?
If you weld your diff it is similar to having a spool installed.



A spool simply locks the rear wheels together rigidly. This eliminates the possibility of spinning the power away through a single unloaded wheel, but also eliminates the possibility of any differential in speed between the rear wheels at all.

A welded diff will make your car pretty un-drivable on the street, at least for regular daily city driving. You would see vastly increased rear tire wear and the car would just handle like crap in general.

It's the sh*t for drifting though! >


If you want any kind of decent regular handling for grip driving and just daily driving in general, you will need a differential of some kind.

The Track Pack and Ultimate Edition Genesis Coupes came with a Torsen gear-type LSD. You can pick them up for reasonably cheap second-hand. The Torsen diff works well to bias drive torque towards whichever rear wheel has more grip. It isn't a 'locking' diff though, it need two firm contact patches to work, so when stationary, at lower speeds, or when a rear wheel lifts off the ground it can still spin power away through the wheel with less grip.



It isn't a huge deal for most drivers and in exchange for this downside in ultimate performance the Torsen LSD is extremely civilized. You can hardly notice it at all in regular driving.

It is possible to get both decent street manners and extreme locking diff action, you just have to acquire some expensive hardware. There are some seriously crazy after-market LSD options for the Genesis Coupe.

We went with a full clutch-type diff on Project Hoondy. Also known as a "Salisbury" LSD, these types of diffs are normally considered too obnoxious for street use because they tend to drag the inside wheel and just act like a welded diff in general.



We got around this problem by running low preload spring pressure, using some special lubricants, along with applying WPC treatment to the LSD's clutch plates and spacer rings:




It cost some good money, but it made for a smooth-driving street car that has tons of rear-axle grip and yet will also drift on command:


Good luck, happy tuning!
Wow that's a very thorough write up haha, thanks! And yea I'm sticking with the BFG G-force sport comp 2. Cant find any reason not to :)
 

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Spools benefit drag racing the most. You could drive it on the street but forget any handling around turns. You will need to make left and right turns slowly. I do not recommend a spool unless it is basically a drag car....and since you have little mods, it would be a waste if time.
 

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And yea I'm sticking with the BFG G-force sport comp 2. Cant find any reason not to :)
It's a very solid tire. The one thing you have to watch out for with them though is tread chop. This is because the BFG Comp 2 is a directional tire, it is designed so that it is only meant to rotate one way. At the tire shop they will mount two of the tires as "left" side wheels and two of them as "right" side wheels. Those tires then must remain on that side of the car. This means they can't be rotated properly.

The tire is always turning in the same direction and it never gets a "rest" by being rotated side-to-side so that it turns the other way. This can cause the trailing edge of the tread blocks to lift which can lead to some nasty uneven tire wear:



Happily, the best way to prevent this is aggressive driving! Regularly putting strong lateral loads on the tire will help even out the wear and prevent the tread blocks from deforming. From what I've seen, bad tread chop on directional tires happens with heavier vehicles that do a lot of highway miles. Just heat those babies up with some hard cornering on the regular and you'll get maximum service life from them.

Good luck, happy tuning!
 
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