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The Throttle Body (TB) coolant bypass modification is pretty easy and already well documented for models up to 2012. I'm just adding to that with a DIY specifically on the 2013 3.8 (maybe 2.0t as well) since it is a little different with the coolant lines on the bottom, requiring extra work to get to them.

The benefit of this modification is to prevent unnecessarily heating the TB and the air passing through it with 175+deg F. coolant. Heating the TB is only necessary in some extremely cold and damp conditions where the throttle plate could freeze up the during a cold start.

This modification is obviously beneficial in theory, but I'm skeptical whether it makes a measurable difference. Anyone with phenolic or thermal gaskets for the TB or surge tank might be more likely to see improvement.

Here's what you'll needed:
Roughly 30 minutes with a cold engine
Phillips #2 screwdriver
Small flat edge screwdriver (optional)
Pliers
Long nose pliers (optional)
1 foot of 5/16" radiator or fuel line hose (<$2)
Heat gun or hair dryer (optional)
Shop wrag or paper towel (optional)


The first part and most of the work is just getting everything out of the way so you can get to the coolant lines on the bottom of the TB. This first section mostly applies to those with the stock airbox.

Disconnect the wire anchor that's attaching the sensor wire to the airbox. Do this by pinching one side of the arrow headed anchor part. A small screwdriver makes this easier:


Unplug the sensor wires and move them out of the way:


Unclip the top of the airbox:


Loosen the hose on he right side of the TB. Use pliers and squeeze the tabs and move the clamp away from the end. There's no need to disconnect it. It just needs to swivel:


Unscrew the clamp on the hose to the left of TB. Again, you only need it to swivel, so just unscrew it until it feels loose:


Loosen the main hose clamp attaching the airbox to the TB. Just unscrew it until there are only a couple gear slots left on the clamp:


Pull the main piece back a half inch from the TB or until it's no longer connected:


With the main hose disconnected and the other two able to swivel, you can lift the top of the airbox up and flip it back so that it lays upside down behind the TB and out of the way:



Now you can finally get to the coolant lines. The rest of this will apply with or without the stock airbox. You should see two lines going to the TB. One is feeding coolant in and the other is returning it back to the coolant system. These two hoses neeed to be removed.

The first step is to squeeze the tabs on all four clamps and slide them toward the middle of the hoses. In this picture you can see one clamp (in the bottom left of the pic) already moved. Long nose pliers make this job a little easier:


Once you have moved all the clamps you can remove the hoses by pulling and twisting them off of the steel connectors. If they won't budge, just warm them up with a heat gun and they will come right off. You should expect a very small amount of coolant to leak out, so put a wrag underneath to catch it.

Use the old hoses to measure a new cut of hose that's 1-2 inches longer that the original ones. You may want to keep the old ones to re-use if you decide to reverse this for very cold climates. Since there isn't much room under there, the original ones that were cut to length may be best. Here's the hose I used for the net step:


The final step is to slide two clamps toward the middle of each of the new hoses and make a closed loop by connecting the coolant feed line to the return line and by connecting the two lines on the TB together. Here's what the end result should look like:


Connecting the two lines on the TB isn't really necessary, but it will keep anything from crawling up in there and from getting any foreign material into the coolant system if you ever reverse this. Here's the final result from another angle:


Lastly, you need to reverse the steps in the first section to put everything back together.

Enjoy
 

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Excellent write-up! Thanks for documenting every step with a picture, that really helps.

I'll be interested to see if you find any improvements because of this mod.
 

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Hmmm I swear i was just thinking this the other day as i did my OCCs,

I wonder if i could just use my 3/8s hose i have left over~
 

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Done in 10 minutes. Wow was the clamps a bitch to get on lol.
 

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V6 proud owner!!
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Hahah!! Thank you for putting that one up!! I did it like the first week I got the car and was asked to do a DIY. At least someone who isn't lazy like me took the time to do it!!! I used the OE line and it works. Great DIY.
 

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I like it!
 

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Cold weather areas...

So why wouldn't keeping this off in cold weather areas during the winter be okay? Is there such a thing as too cold of air for the intake? Like sub-zero? At what point is the air too cold for the engine to be at peak performance? Cold air = increased performance to a certain extent... :confused:

I live in CO and plan on this bypass since the summers are hot, but want to know if I should hook this back up in the winter when I'm driving - with no snow or ice on the roads of course.
 

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V6 proud owner!!
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I'd hook it back up just to prevent any icing of the throttle body! Cold and humid air tend to cause icing condition!! That's why people hook it back up during the cold season!
 

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HiTHOOM
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Good job R_Shackleford...

I live in Middle East countrys and the temp here too hot where it rich 113F in the summer and 60-64F in the winter.

Do you think it will work properly here??
 

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Bringing up a semi old thread here, but I just wanted to add that with the Injen SRI, I literally just reached around it and did it in about 2 minutes. No intake removal needed. I also wanted to add that you should NOT use the hoses you take off as they will kink. Buy some hose like the write up says. You don't need to put on a hose on the 2 TB nipples, just cap them off
 

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This is interesting...
 

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Go Hyundai!
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I removed the entire piping all the way back to the water pump and put two caps on the ports. I got the caps at Advance Auto, made for auxiliary heater ports. I guess I went a little farther than most.
 

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I removed the entire piping all the way back to the water pump and put two caps on the ports. I got the caps at Advance Auto, made for auxiliary heater ports. I guess I went a little farther than most.
I decided to do this bypass and I also removed the short section of hardline. It is held in by a 10mm bolt that also has a clip for an electrical wire, you can see it in the last pic of the 1st post. To get to the far end of the piping you can remove two bolts from the resonator box and get it out of the way.

I picked up a 4-pack of 5/16 caps (Dorman #47394 ) which will cover all the connectors. The corbin clips from the original lines are too big to hold the new caps on securely. You will need ~1/2" clamps to replace them.
 
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No, but if you would like some I can take some pictures and upload them later
 

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For people wondering if they need to re connect in the winter , I have been with out all year round . No freeze ups
 

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Court Jester
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Figures I see this now..... just had these hoses off to replace spark plugs and install a phenolic spacer! :lol:

Will be hitting the auto parts store tomorrow for 1' of hose.

With a R2C intake, the hoses are pretty easy to get to.
 

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Full throttle!!
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in the last photo, the bottom hose is connected to circuit? i can´t see...

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