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w3rD ^
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
As the title states this is a DIY of how insanely simple it is to swap out pads on our gens. Safe yourself some money and do it yourself the video is 7 minutes long so the other side should take the same amount so what I'm trying to say is this shouldn't take longer than 20 minutes total to do this.

ENJOY :D

Brake Pad change on a Brembo equipped Genesis Coupe - YouTube
 

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POV Futografee
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Thanks for the video! Also, you're a brave man for only using that scissor jack lol I had two of mine break as I was jacking up the car. Lo Pro jack only for this guy!
 

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w3rD ^
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Discussion Starter #3
haha that was just to get my car up a few inches to get my real jack underneathe! My car is low from sportlines and it doesnt help that my driveway has a few dips in it here and there making the ground uneven!

-for the record definitely use a mallet or using another object to knock in the pins if you are afraid of going at it with a regular hammer. I was very indifferent in this video because I know these are going to become powdercoated soon
 

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Super Moderator
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Good DIY, just a few things though,

1) you posted this in the wrong section, I'll move it though.
2) use a wooden dowel pin and a rubber mallet to avoid damaging the slide pins or the calipers
link to example: http://woodproducts.caldowel.com/images/products/detail/50mm-Dowel-Pins-x-6mm.jpg
3) the slide pins can be removed easier if you push down on the pad spring that applies tension on the pin as well as the center of the pads
4) a small amount of grease should be applied to the slide pins to allow the pads to slide along them without galling them.
5) if you install the top slide pin first, you can put the pad spring in after the slide pin is all the way, it just clips from underneath and it'll stay up while you install the lower slide pin.
6) before you reinstall your pads use a caliper safe cleaner to remove the brake dust as it can cause the pads to jam leading to brake failure, pulling during braking or brake drag

Great how-to though, you're right, dealers charge far too much for this just because "Brembo" is attached to the caliper. Everyone should know how to change their own brake pads, thanks for this.
 

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w3rD ^
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Discussion Starter #6
hahah yeah sorry you guys had to watch that horrific murder... good things brembos are already red ;)

In all seriousness I believe my lack of care was just knowing they are not staying this color and will be changing the color up :)

Thanks guys!
 

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Great DIY :)

Like a lot of us, I also recently did the same thing (with EBC pads, rather than Hawk). I noticed before I ordered that EBC part number info wasn't easy to find or verify, due to Brembo vs non, and different part listings on different websites. So, for future Googlers, here's what I found out for Brembo Calipers (2.0T R-Spec, 3.8 R-Spec, 3.8 Track/Ultimate).

Front Redstuff: DP31210C
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000CGVPEW
(currently, ignore that Amazon falsely reports these will not fit your Brembo car)

Rear Redstuff: DP31140C (interchangeable with DP31156C ??)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000CGVPLA
(I was sent a "DP31140C" box with "DP31156C" written on the pad backing plates)

I noticed that some of the EBC part numbers are similar across their Green, Red, Yellow and Blue series.

The DP1210C Redstuff pads fit perfectly in the front calipers, much like you see in the video posted above. In the rear, though, the DP1140C Redstuff (mine were marked on the plates as DP1156C) pads would not slide into the calipers, although they visually matched the OEM Ferodo pads. So, I carefully and gently sanded the caliper-guided edges of these rear pads down using a belt sander. You could also sand by hand in a pinch, or use a rasp or grinder, etc. You may only need to shave less than 1mm off each side, most of which is the paint coating. I took care to slightly bevel the ground edges to remove any burs.

I used a small amount of the EBC lube on the pins, backing plates, and in the case of the rears due to the sanding, on the sliding edges of the rear pads, but not before cleaning each corner's components thoroughly. I used Armour All's Extreme Wheel & Tire Cleaner, which is safe for the Brembo paint and does a fantastic job lifting all the hidden dust and grease from parts. After a few minutes I rinsed and then I then coated everything (except rotor pad surfaces) liberally with Armour All Tire Foam. A detailing trick, tire foam makes everything look new, basically, coating with a petroleum-based residue which lasts for a good while, depending on rain driving.

So, I'm impressed with the EBC Redstuff ceramic pads over the metallic and incredibly dusty Ferodo pads used in the OEM Brembos. I hope this info supplements the video and helps anyone who may be looking to order EBC.
 
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I watched this video and then did the replacement. What I noticed is that there is a thin metal piece on the back of the pads that were originally on the car. do I put those metal pieces on the new pads? It looks like you didn't. The squealer was on the top on my new pad, I don't know if that makes a difference.

I ended up having to replace the rotors too. The inside pad wore all the way down and scored the rotor. After replacing everything and not using very much brake grease, my brakes squeal very loudly after warming up. So I'm asking about the metal pieces because I'm wondering if I should not have put them on the replacements.
 
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No, those are backing plates for the specific pads you took off. The new pads should be ready to go from the manufacturer. New pads are going to squeal a bit until you fully bed them, which you should do by following the directions. After that process, the squealing will go away. In future, you will be checking and replacing the pads more often, so your new rotors should last 100k miles or several sets of pads.
 

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Golden Chariot
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New pads are going to squeal a bit until you fully bed them, which you should do by following the directions. After that process, the squealing will go away.
I've tried bedding my new pads twice. Only my front driver brakes are squealing. I don't have the tools to change my pads so I had a auto shop take them off and put them back on again. And still, the front driver brakes squeals. People can hear them over the phone! I give up :(
 

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All you need for the pads is a jack, lug wrench, and a hammer. I used a skinny screw driver to tap the pins out. Then you can slide the pads out. I would pull them out and then apply brake grease to the pads.

I pulled mine out and put the whole tube of brake grease on the back side of the pads. Now i only have a minor bit of squeal. I'm hopping the others are correct and the squeal goes away.
 

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No, that's way too much grease, and it's probably running in between the pads and rotors, which is not good.

Okay, let's start over :D First, clean the whole assembly with something like ArmourAll Xtreme Wheel Cleaner. Spray a whole bottle of that stuff all over your calipers, pads, and rotors, then rinse off (blow dry, even). Then drive some more and see if the squealing has stopped.

If not, I'd pull the pads out and start from scratch by cleaning everything again very well and inspecting, ensuring all the pistons are moving freely. Then put a very small film of grease only on the backing plate, or also on the running sides (as I did because of sanding them down), and then reinstall (that little tube of grease that comes with a single pair of pads should be enough to install several sets!). Once you use the grease, don't wash the calipers for a few days until they settle in. You should not need to bed the pads again, really, but a few hard stops wouldn't hurt.

My guess is that will solve both of your squealing issues :)
 

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The grease in the tiny little tubes I got I got was thick and gelled up quickly. I think I'm okay. I'll wait until next weekend to see if I still have squeal. The tube was the size of my little finger.

I bought auto zone brake cleaner. I'll re-evaluate next week or so. I think I'm going to have to replace the rotors with something better. I bought auto zone rotors. The first one I put on was warped. I could tell when I spun it. It had a high spot. and when I applied the brakes at speed, the front end wobbled. So I returned it. Now there is a slight wobble. I think the passenger side may be slightly warped. The boxes the rotors came in were beat to heck like something was stacked on top of it. I would have ordered something online, but I didn't plan on replacing the rotors. I had no choice but to go with the auto zone offering.
 

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Well, that begs the question, whoever told you your original rotors needed replacing? Some AutoZone dude? My guess is they were fine. They're not going to be as smooth as glass, mind you. Small ridge and groove variations are normal, because they've been scraped with ferrous iron pads for X-thousand miles. This is what the new (hopefully ceramic) pads are "bedding" into, you see. So, it's possible you could go back to the OEM rotors and use your new pads (and hopefully return the new rotors and get your money back??). The pads are meant to be "sacrificial", and these rotors should last a long, long time.
 

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Golden Chariot
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That's what I had my auto shop do...start it all over from scratch. But what they didnt tell me was that the tension pad spring is not there which means they person I had originally change my pads didn't put it back on. But I'm not sure if that's where the squeaking is coming from.
 

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Nicely done man. Everybody should aspire to be able to change their brakes this quickly. It spoils you pretty quick.
 

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final report. so I uninstalled and reinstalled the pads. I drove like crazy hitting the breaks hard. The squealing never stopped, it only got WORSE! The wobble at high speeds when the brakes applied never went away. Then my shipment from genracer arrived. Hawk pads with high performance rotors! I again, for the third time took everything apart. As soon as I put the rotors on and spun them, I could tell they were true, there were no high spots. I KNOW true wheels because I used to be a cyclist, true wheels was a must. Anyway, I spun both sides and both rotors were true. So I know the auto zone CRAP was just that, CRAP. The Textar pads that O'Reily sold me I think were metallic, the guy told me they were ceramic. But after checking Textar website, I don't think they sell ceramic. If only I saved the receipt and box I'd take em back.

So I waited until I drove on the new setup for a few days before posting. I have not had one squeal since the change. So, if you are having a lot of squeal or wobble when you apply the breaks at high speed, it just might be f'up rotors and crappy pads.
 
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