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:gc-smiley-sign-i-ag Great advise, bit overkill for most.

Definately order with a WOOD roller. I buy from ebay, some include no roller, some plastic rollers, they break.

Roller and utility is only thing really needed. While yes, wiping it down, and heating it up is for best case scenario, I have found dynamat extreme that isn't years old will pretty much stick to anything. I honestly didn't wipe it down, and only heated it up in weird corners/angles that I could not use a roller on effectively. But again, my car is a 2012 so a 2009 or something may have more dirt/dust/carpet fibers. Anything hidden by carpet you should be able to wipe with paper towel and water for the most part. Use knife to cut it and to pop any bubbles then roll them down. Don't be afraid to change blades often, The aluminum backing dulls them quick.

And he is 100% correct only only using on exterior panels, unless you replace speakers. Then I would also do panels those are attached to. If you have a sub, rear deck and some interior panels will be needed to help keep vibration down.
There is alot of good info here guys and gals!! Both of you should do a indepth how to so it can be a sticky!!!
 

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Solosier;1180918 The dynamat on the plastic panels? Don't do it. Especially cutting it up to tiny pieces to fit in each spot. wow. you must have been bored. [/QUOTE said:
Well i only did this because i saw another thread of a guy doing this.
but at the same time, my friend was bored, so i told him to do that. and he chose to cut it up.

also the material i bought was duct insulation. it only uses simple foam and foil. im a college student so i cant afford the good stuff .lol

but thank you for the input. i love learning about this stuff.
 

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Well i only did this because i saw another thread of a guy doing this.
but at the same time, my friend was bored, so i told him to do that. and he chose to cut it up.

also the material i bought was duct insulation. it only uses simple foam and foil. im a college student so i cant afford the good stuff .lol

but thank you for the input. i love learning about this stuff.
Lol. i kinda miss college when I could be that bored. This whole grown up thing kinda sucks. I mean, having more money is good, but jobs, mortgages, bills, yuck. I remember living on $60/week in college (in 90s). I can't even live on $60/day now. yikes.
 

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haha. i actually chose to go for a 5th year super senior and pick up 2 more majors instead of entering THE REAL WORLD D: hahaha
but maybe when im "grownup" ill use some serious rubber
 

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When I am done with my car, I will try to find a bone stock R Spec and I will measure the differences. I would be curious on this, too.
That would be cool. I plan on deadening at least my trunk but chances are I will do the whole car. Back in 93 I had a 90 Honda Accord coupe and I measured it before and after. I layered the heck out of that car. I can not remember the actual numbers but it was very significant...I want to say around 20db or greater. The car was super quiet. But it was also had every square inch of interior sheet metal covered.
 

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This look like a great product.
Ehh.. adding moisture absorbing things to your inner fenders seems counterproductive to adding plastic fenders in the first place?


I too was an IASCA judge and in the car audio industry for 23 years. I must have put in thousands of sq ft of deading material over the years and I agree with what you are saying. I plan on applying a layer of Stinger material to my car soon.

One question I was going to ask here and I have had many debates with people on other forums over the years is "Has anyone done an actual test to confirm how well a product works?" So has anyone on this forum done that? The reason I ask such a thing is because it is important to know when shopping for anything how well it actually works compared to other products designed for the same purpose. Sorry guys but the human is ear far from perfect and not a good tool to use to measure volume.

How to test. A test vehicle is needed that has no extra form of sound deadening material added to it. Along with a db meter. Drive the car around without the radio playing and windows close. Take measurements of the decibel levels in the car...say cruising at 55, at idle, and under acceleration. Then install the product and repeat the test in the same fashion. It is rather simple and gives an accurate measurement of how well a product works. If a dealer for the product could do this or know the information it will help with sales of the product. Personally I never believe a salesman that tells me "It works, I know it works." I always ask "How do you know?"
The JL audio RTA app is great and I use it all the time (iphone). I have another RTA app (might be called spectrum analyzer?) which is good too.

There are soo many misconceptions on here about audio in general I don´t know where to start, so I haven´t. I have made my track quiter in the rear half and that is where most of the noise is comming from. However, going the all american 110% dynamat coverage like you see on TV is bad, heavy and totally besides the point (of noise reduction, not selling you product of course).

I´ll do my front wheel arches when I get time and the A pillars and roof and no more as I want to hear the engine still :). The rear half is super easy and took me 3 hours on a sunny saturday including dis- and reassembly. This car is very easy to work with with minimal clamp, latching -whatever plastic menaces from hell that always are on to tight and brakes at the most inconvinient time.
 

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for what it's worth here's a little info on sound and insulation that might help anyone trying to quiet their cabin.

there are two types of noise: structure-borne (SBN) and air-borne (ABN)

- damping treatments (like dynamat) work well for SBN, where vibrations from the powertrain, or road or whatnot cause the normally lightly-damped sheet metal skin / panels to vibrate and radiate noise. By adding damping, the panels don't "ring" as much when excited by structural vibrations, thus reducing sound generated by the panels.

- to control ABN (such as wind noise, wet road / splash noise, some tire noise, etc) where acoustic energy strikes the wheel well, or thin-sheet metal skin / panels, you need air-tightness and mass. Dynamat won't help much for this kind of noise. What's best is a limp mass (like loaded vinyl or rubber) decoupled from the panel (with foam or something resilient). Of course this adds weight, which sports car owners probably don't want to do :D

one of these days I'm planning to do some diagnostics and treatments to my GC to lower the sound level. (As a noise control engineer, I'm pretty sensitive to noise. I expected the GC to be noisier than my Accord -- which it is -- but it's not too bad. About what I expected for an affordable sports coupe. I'm positive I can make it a lot quieter after some good diagnostic work :D just haven't gotten around to it yet.)
Did you ever end up diagnosing it?
 
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