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Discussion Starter #1
In this video I review the ATQ subframe bushings and show how to install them.

Review lasts 5 minutes, after that is the installation.

 

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Timbit Biter
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Awesome! Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just out of curiosity... why would you need a solid spacer in the rear if it is attached to a rubber bushing?

And nice video... I always enjoy watching your how to's
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Realigns the mains and keeps the bushing dowels from shifting.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The bushing dowel is the metal center to the bushing that is wrapped in poly or rubber that the bolt and chassis act against. The subframe bushing is basically press fit into the subframe so the outer casing of the bushing acts on the subframe, not the dowel directly. Now everything moves as follows, the suspension pushes on the subframe, the subframe pushings on the bushing casing, the bushing casing pushes on the bushing material (rubber in the case of the GC) which then pushes dowel and acts directly on the chassis through the bolt. By securing the top part of the bolt it prevents the top of the dowel from acting in a different fashion than the bottom which benefits from direct contact with the chassis itself.

Is it as good as a solid subframe bushing? Absolutely not but it's significantly more livable than solid bushings on roads that are not racetrack smooth.

As for realigns the mains, sorry I was on my phone and didn't explain that correctly, because the rear subframe "floats" unlike the front one which is all solid (no bushings at each corner relying on suspension and engine mounts), you can do everything by itself as the bushings will compress and as the bushing dowels are forced back to their ideal spot as you remove the play at the top of the bolt, everything gets pulled back into place and the bushings are allowed to relax as you finish up.
Mains = the four main subframe bushings as there are actually seven in the rear but three are used on the differential.
 

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Discussion Starter #12

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OK, the passenger rear/rear will not cooperate, the other three were easy. Without a jack holding up that side the bolt is almost touching the metal, if I jack it up the bolt actually touches the metal. Any ideas?
 

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Put a jack under the rear subframe on that side. With a piece of wood lift the subframe until it touches the body again. Put the collar in place. The. Put the nut on the stud. Using a ratchet tighten the collar until it pops into place. Then release the jack take the nut off. Put the cover back on and the nut and tighten to spec.
Tried that, from several spots and angles hoping it would push the sub frame a little in the right direction, but jacking it up only made it worse. I drove the car a little, hoping with the other three in it will settle and center itself, will try again tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
You can also try placing a deep socket on the collar and giving it a love tap with a rubber mallet, which I did suggest in the video. Have it jacked up like Genie's suggestion or jack up on the bottom control arm where it meets the subframe, this will take the load off the subframe and let the rubber mallet do its job as the rubber won't be loaded and the collar will go in without trying to fight the weight of that side of the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
^ that. But since I and 99% of the people in the GC community don't own or have casual access to one I try my best to cover things in a fashion that meets our abilities.
 

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Would this be easier on a lift?
Having done sway bars, exhaust work, and now these, yes it would be easier on a lift. But if you jack the car up high enough (with jack stands) and have the right tools these mods can all be done at home without much trouble, and having DIYs like Snoopy's makes it easier.

You can also try placing a deep socket on the collar and giving it a love tap with a rubber mallet, which I did suggest in the video. Have it jacked up like Genie's suggestion or jack up on the bottom control arm where it meets the subframe, this will take the load off the subframe and let the rubber mallet do its job as the rubber won't be loaded and the collar will go in without trying to fight the weight of that side of the car.
I did that on the driver side one, but trust me there is no room on the other side to even get the collar started, I'd be tapping it against the metal bushing. When I try again later today I'll take a picture of how close the bolt is to the bushing if it still doesn't cooperate.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Flip the socket over so the flat side is on the collar vs. the lip of the nut hex, the bolt should slip right into the 1/2 drive port of it when it gets on.
 
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