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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Who on here has swapped out the flywheel on their 3.8 going to a single unit?How dramatic is the difference in acceleration?
...Is this something your typical performance/tuning shop can do, or would I be better off going to a reliable transmission shop? How long to just swap out the flywheel...while keeping the stock clutch in place?
Thanks
 

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shorttrack
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Why would you go with a lighter flywheel for around $700.00 plus the cost of labor and not install a HD clutch system ? Common sense dictates if you go lighter on the flywheel you will want more clamping force to offset the amount of slippage you will be doing to get moving at times because of the lost moment of inertia due to the lighter flywheel .If a speed shop says it is a good idea to do such a waste of money 1/2 @$$ job you would be well advised to leave them alone .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The flywheels I was looking at said they would work well with the stock clutch. My 2010 coupe just turned 50,000 miles.. and the stock clutch is still working good. Because of your reply...i will look into adding a new clutch as well and do a little more research on the subject.
 

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The flywheels I was looking at said they would work well with the stock clutch. My 2010 coupe just turned 50,000 miles.. and the stock clutch is still working good. Because of your reply...i will look into adding a new clutch as well and do a little more research on the subject.
Most performance clutch kits I have looked at fall in the $350 to $550 range. Personally I would recommend going for that upgrade at the same time if I were you. I'm not sure what he quoted you for the install, but my mechanic quoted me about $800 to change out my throw out bearing, but I waited to do any work because I'd prefer to change the clutch at the same time, considering he would have to drop the transmission again and it would be another $800 or so. It only makes sense to replace parts in the same area at the same time. Cause it would suck pretty hard if you replaced the flywheel, then 3 months later for some reason had to replace the clutch. ACT makes some good clutch kits. I know the owners and talked with them about the HD Perf kit and it sounds like a great replacement. My mechanic is a normal, everyday mechanic and I've had transmission/clutch replacements done by him no problem. So the choice of shop is yours. Definitely get recommendations from people in your area though. But ultimately if you are going to pay for the labor already, I'd upgrade every "common wear-out part" (as my warranty company would put it) at the same time. I'd even replace the throw out bearing if I were you. But that's just my two cents. It's your build though man, and at that point you get every say in what you do to it!

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shorttrack
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Most performance clutch kits I have looked at fall in the $350 to $550 range. Personally I would recommend going for that upgrade at the same time if I were you. I'm not sure what he quoted you for the install, but my mechanic quoted me about $800 to change out my throw out bearing, but I waited to do any work because I'd prefer to change the clutch at the same time, considering he would have to drop the transmission again and it would be another $800 or so. It only makes sense to replace parts in the same area at the same time. Cause it would suck pretty hard if you replaced the flywheel, then 3 months later for some reason had to replace the clutch. ACT makes some good clutch kits. I know the owners and talked with them about the HD Perf kit and it sounds like a great replacement. My mechanic is a normal, everyday mechanic and I've had transmission/clutch replacements done by him no problem. So the choice of shop is yours. Definitely get recommendations from people in your area though. But ultimately if you are going to pay for the labor already, I'd upgrade every "common wear-out part" (as my warranty company would put it) at the same time. I'd even replace the throw out bearing if you were you. But that's just my two cents. It's your build though man, and at that point you get every say in what you do to it!

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Smart man ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^.I went with a spec flywheel and stage 3+ clutch and new throw out .Doing the work myself, I agree change everything the same time at once.
 

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...my mechanic quoted me about $800 to change out my throw out bearing...
Ouch. What locality are you in? Sounds like San Bernardino prices. We paid about $350 in labor for a complete clutch change on Project Hoondy. Granted, that's at a backwater ******* hot-roddin' shop on the outskirts of a small Midwestern city. A gallon of milk is $1.79 out here.

It only makes sense to replace parts in the same area at the same time. Cause it would suck pretty hard if you replaced the flywheel, then 3 months later for some reason had to replace the clutch.
I agree change everything the same time at once.
Anyway, CVanArsdale and shorttrack have the right idea about replacing the clutch and flywheel together. Labor is such a major part of servicing clutch components that it's almost always better to change everything out in one go. To be fair, there is some merit to the idea of swapping out the flywheel and leaving the clutch in that the OEM pressure plate and friction disk are quite decent parts whereas the OEM dual mass flywheel is a total piece of crap. Still, better to do it all together.

Project Hoondy is a 2010 V6 MT car and we changed out the complete clutch assembly at 45K miles because we had a leaking slave cylinder. You have to pull the trans to replace that part, so we decided to do a full clutch and flywheel upgrade at the same time. The OEM flywheel is pretty terrible and were were motivated to replace it. We went with all ACT flywheel and clutch components.



The original friction disk and pressure plate on Project Hoondy were in great shape at 45K miles, but the dual mass flywheel was completely hashed:



Ditching that nasty dual mass flywheel really wakes the car up. That said, don't expect big acceleration gains. It's more of a huge improvement in your ability to interact with the drivetrain. Shift quality can be drastically improved, BUT you'll need supporting modifications in order to really feel that benefit.

Shift quality on MT Genesis Coupes is notoriously sh*t for a few different reasons. The factory manual transmission fluid spec is wrong, the dual mass flywheel is horrible, and the engine/trans/differential mounts are hopelessly inadequate.

If you want to have a really enjoyable manual trans GenCoupe then you need to take a holistic approach to modifying it. Improved drivetrain mounts, clutch components, and fluids work together to transform the Genesis Coupe's driving experience from vague and tiresome to something truly engaging and easy to enjoy.

Good luck and happy tuning!
 
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