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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, since this is my first post I'll introduce myself. My name is Vini and I recently purchased a 2011 2.0T A/T around a month ago. Although it has its issues being a used car, I absolutely love it. Brevity is not one of my strongest traits so please, bear with me.

Anyway, I'm in the middle of replacing my timing chain. My car jumped timing due to the stretched chain, but I still have compression and the car starts after cranking for awhile. I've gotten everything off and out of the way but I'm confused on how to reset the timing. Can I just turn the cams or will I damage the engine? This is my first time doing something like this.

Also, the repair manual says to use Loctite 5900H for the sealant to put the timing cover back on. Does anybody know of another sealant that I can use instead? I can't seem to find that specific one at any stores.

Thank you!
 

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Where are the marks now? Where is the crank at? You can unbolt the cams and set the crank then set the cams.

I just used Permatex Ultra on my front cover. You can get it about anywhere.

Permatex 82180 Ultra Black Maximum Oil Resistance RTV
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Where are the marks now? Where is the crank at? You can unbolt the cams and set the crank then set the cams.

I just used Permatex Ultra on my front cover. You can get it about anywhere.

Permatex 82180 Ultra Black Maximum Oil Resistance RTV
Here's some pictures of where my marks are:
Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Alloy wheel
Brown Wood Amber Gold Metal
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Gear Bicycle part Rim

The marks in the first picture are kindof hard to see. The line one is at the top and the one that looks like a dot is near the bottom, it's kindof orange colored.

So, remove the old chain, unbolt the cams, put the crank pulley back on to set the crank, set the cams, install upgraded chain, new guides, and tensioner, then put it all back together? Would I need to make sure the cams are in the correct position before tightening them back down? Thanks for the sealant suggestion by the way, I'll go pick some up tomorrow. I'm assuming the permatex will be good for the oil pan seal as well? I didn't remove it completely, just took the front cover off so I need to reseal where it bolts to the cover.
 

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I just finished successfully doing the timing chain service to my car and I didn't have to unbolt my cams. You're supposed to set #1 to tdc before you even take the crankshaft pulley off. That way you know how far your timing is off and you can judge the likely hood for bent valves is from there.
 

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You would only need to unbolt the cams to set the timing if the chain broke or you had no idea what the timing was.

Did you lock your cams in place when setting the chain?
 

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Been studying his pictures a little more I've noticed something. That motor is not set to tdc for cylinder one. From the picture of the crank sprocket I can see that he lined up the wrong mark. That dot is for the marked link on the new chain. The crankshaft key should be where that dot is. I think he has the marks confused. The timing marks for the camshaft are lines that are close to the center of the cams. The dots on the outer edge are for the initial setting of the new chain. It will have marked links that line up with them. I can see all of his marks and none of them are where they are supposed to be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Okay so, still doing the job. Sorry for the late response, I have been very busy with work.

I ended up removing the chain and removing the cams as Red said. I had no idea what timing was before and I knew it was off because the car would idle like garbage and the chain was stretched almost an unbelievable amount. I could move the chain up and down a good inch or so, and that was with the guides and tensioner installed. With the cams off, I reset the crankshaft to TDC on the #1 compression stroke. Then, I positioned the cams to roughly where they should've been then torqued them down, then adjusted them to be in time with the crank. Put the chain back on did way more revolutions than required and everything lines up perfectly.

The reason I removed the chain and cams was that the chain was so stretched, I didn't want anything to slip while I turned the crank and cause any damage. It made it harder but I feel that it was the safest route to take. Thanks for the suggestion Red.

Now all that's left is to reseal the timing cover and bolt everything back on.
 

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Did you notice how far out the tensioner was on clicks? Mine was 4 out of 8. It's a poor set up as they should have a tensioner at the top between the cams too.

Don't forget the little round rubber bushing for the oil overflow at the front of the head.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I didn't really pay attention to it but I remember noticing that it was out pretty damn far. Maybe 6?

By the rubber bushing, you mean this right? Does that need replacing? Also replacing the crankshaft seal since I'm already in here.

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Okay so, still doing the job. Sorry for the late response, I have been very busy with work.

I ended up removing the chain and removing the cams as Red said. I had no idea what timing was before and I knew it was off because the car would idle like garbage and the chain was stretched almost an unbelievable amount. I could move the chain up and down a good inch or so, and that was with the guides and tensioner installed. With the cams off, I reset the crankshaft to TDC on the #1 compression stroke. Then, I positioned the cams to roughly where they should've been then torqued them down, then adjusted them to be in time with the crank. Put the chain back on did way more revolutions than required and everything lines up perfectly.

The reason I removed the chain and cams was that the chain was so stretched, I didn't want anything to slip while I turned the crank and cause any damage. It made it harder but I feel that it was the safest route to take. Thanks for the suggestion Red.

Now all that's left is to reseal the timing cover and bolt everything back on.
Yea, I just held my hand down on the chain between the cam sprockets and let the oily chain slide along the palm of my hand to make sure it didn't skip any more teeth.
 
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