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POV Futografee
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2,407 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I figured instead of blasting other peoples threads with pics and asking for advice, I'd just create my own :gc-noob: I'm open to all advice and critiques! And yes, I have also been doing some reading as well, but I'm more of a "hands-on" learner lol

Beginner's luck happened with this pic of the Christmas tree. I'm sure I did some things wrong, but I like the way it turned out lol


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I've noticed that my main problem is things showing up blurry. I'm assuming it's partly my shaky hands (I'll have my tripod tomorrow) or that I'm not adjusting my settings correctly.

I took these on Aperture Priority and played with the ISO as I moved in and out of the sun... but I haven't quite nailed it yet. Maybe I'm not adjusting my shutter speed enough?...


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Former GenesisCoupe Owner
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856 Posts
Not bad buddy. Once you get your tripod, start playing in photoshop, and then you'll be addicted and buying expensive equipment. lol
I like your incurve rims!
 

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Shut up and take my money
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4,726 Posts
Not bad buddy. Once you get your tripod, start playing in photoshop, and then you'll be addicted and buying expensive equipment. lol
I like your incurve rims!
lol +1 on all that

Direct sun is really hard to shoot in.. unless it's a look you're going for. Some of those shots could be slightly better composed but overall a great start! Welcome to your new expensive and addicting hobby :D
 

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POV Futografee
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2,407 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Not bad buddy. Once you get your tripod, start playing in photoshop, and then you'll be addicted and buying expensive equipment. lol
I like your incurve rims!
They look good to me,Noob. Nice lookin GC!
Thanks! :bigthumbup:

lol +1 on all that

Direct sun is really hard to shoot in.. unless it's a look you're going for. Some of those shots could be slightly better composed but overall a great start! Welcome to your new expensive and addicting hobby :D
I kept going through our FB messages and GenCoupeGeek's post while I was taking pics... trying to remember everything and apply it lol
 

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Registered
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171 Posts
The hardest part of taking great photos is composition - and you sir have a great eye. You're images are interesting, composed well and you frame the scene nicely. Learning about lighting, aperture, ISO, blah, blah, etc... will come as you get experience - but like I said earlier - its all about composing a shot and "seeing" the shot - you got that in spades. Oh, and I'm a professional (some might even say an expert) in the creative world - so I know a little of what I speak.
 

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Super Moderator
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40,512 Posts
^^ +1 Photoshop can't fix bad composition.

Way back in my film days, I would shoot 3 or 4 36 exposure rolls in a single shoot. I started with B&W because it was cheaper and I could develop and print the film myself with a pretty simple lab. The one thing I loved about B&W photography is that it forces you to think about composition because there are no colors to make the picture interesting.

Of course, in the age of digital photography there is absolutely no reason why you can't shoot 4 or 500 shots in a single session. As you get better, you'll find that you need fewer shots to get that one shot that you look at and say, "WOW". What going through hundreds of shots does for you though is that it teaches your eye what looks good and what does not. Subtle lighting changes, playing with light and shadow, unusual angles, cropping, and perspectives can make a huge difference in what the camera "sees". Keep in mind that a photograph captures a single moment in time. This makes what the camera sees and what your eye sees different because your brain has an expectation that things change; thus, it does not always capture the subtle differences that a camera can catch.

My advice to new photographers.... go everywhere with your camera. Shoot often and shoot a lot. Pretty soon your eye will be able to frame up a shot without a lot of conscious thought.
 

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POV Futografee
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2,407 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
The hardest part of taking great photos is composition - and you sir have a great eye. You're images are interesting, composed well and you frame the scene nicely. Learning about lighting, aperture, ISO, blah, blah, etc... will come as you get experience - but like I said earlier - its all about composing a shot and "seeing" the shot - you got that in spades. Oh, and I'm a professional (some might even say an expert) in the creative world - so I know a little of what I speak.
^^ +1 Photoshop can't fix bad composition.

Way back in my film days, I would shoot 3 or 4 36 exposure rolls in a single shoot. I started with B&W because it was cheaper and I could develop and print the film myself with a pretty simple lab. The one thing I loved about B&W photography is that it forces you to think about composition because there are no colors to make the picture interesting.

Of course, in the age of digital photography there is absolutely no reason why you can't shoot 4 or 500 shots in a single session. As you get better, you'll find that you need fewer shots to get that one shot that you look at and say, "WOW". What going through hundreds of shots does for you though is that it teaches your eye what looks good and what does not. Subtle lighting changes, playing with light and shadow, unusual angles, cropping, and perspectives can make a huge difference in what the camera "sees". Keep in mind that a photograph captures a single moment in time. This makes what the camera sees and what your eye sees different because your brain has an expectation that things change; thus, it does not always capture the subtle differences that a camera can catch.

My advice to new photographers.... go everywhere with your camera. Shoot often and shoot a lot. Pretty soon your eye will be able to frame up a shot without a lot of conscious thought.
Thanks guys! I have been noticing that a lot of my ideas don't always transfer to what ends up on the camera... But I think today's outing was fairly successful. My biggest challenge is going to be actually learning the camera so that I don't have to use Photoshop as much. And learning all about Photoshop is another goal lol Makes my damn head hurt!

I appreciate all the info thus far!
 

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POV Futografee
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2,407 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
All this time off for the holiday's is giving me plenty of play-time with the camera.

Got my tripod in today and decided to head out with the wife's car for some pics. It's even harder to shoot a white car in direct sunlight lol Some of the pics got kinda blown out... I adjusted it as much as I could before it started looking yellowish.


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Gonna try and take some pics with a couple other GC's this weekend. Hopefully get a little change of scenery downtown!
 

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Shut up and take my money
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4,726 Posts
you want change of scenery, come to Canadialand :D

man I'm so jealous of all that warmth :wtc: Great choice of wheels on the Veloster!
 

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POV Futografee
Joined
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2,407 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
That front shot with the mountains in the back :gc-drool1:
:bigthumbup:

you want change of scenery, come to Canadialand :D

man I'm so jealous of all that warmth :wtc: Great choice of wheels on the Veloster!
You already know my feelings on cold/foggy/rainy weather lol The only reason I'd come to Canada is to see some more of those gorgeous military women that y'all like to hide haha

Give me some insight on these next pics- I tried some more night time stuff, and I'm guessing that my ISO was too high for these. It didn't seem like there was much light out there, but the camera shows a ton of it.

Should I be adjusting my shutter speed as well? Maybe try and not put the car directly near so much of the light? Should I have not put the lightsource directly in the shot?


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POV Futografee
Joined
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2,407 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
^Oh, and I did try 2 different settings for the white balance, but I couldn't really tell a difference in the pics....
 

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Super Moderator
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40,512 Posts
Night shots are a perfect candidate for multiple exposures/combining layers in Photoshop. When you shoot, bracket your shot +2-0- -2... The burned in parts, use the darkened exposure... the dark spots use the lighter exposure. You can use post processing to correct an unbalanced light condition much the same way that HDR balances color and exposure. Properly balanced, you can keep one part of the photo from blowing out and keep the details on the subject.
 

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POV Futografee
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2,407 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
^ So basically, I would be taking 3 pics and overlapping them? Which means I need to get a better photoshop program... and learn how to use it lol
 

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Super Moderator
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40,512 Posts
Yeps...Photoshop can be your best friend .
 

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Automotive Photographer
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296 Posts
Nice start. I have some tips for you based on what you've already shown.

1- Let your subject breathe. What I mean by this is back the camera up, to allow the picture tell the story of how the subject arrived there. Why is it significant for the subject to be there? Allow for your subject most of the time to only take up a maximum of 1/6 of your total frame. This will really stretch your composition ability.

2- Don't crop your photos in post. Use your frame as a painter would use his full canvas size. This becomes your true, full vision.

3- Fake dof is fake. Don't bother with it, don't add it. Go buy a fast lens and learn how to use it to your advantage.

4- Learn the advantage of multiple exposure blending in photoshop. A lot of people will go through an HDR phase. Just avoid that phase altogether by bracketing your exposures, but selectively blending the layers in photoshop to garner a more realistic look. Your results will thank you, and so will our eyes.

5- Take a shot list with you. If there is a photo that you want to try and emulate, print it off and take it with you on your next shoot, or storyboard with a pencil and paper the type of composition you wish to attain. This is the photographer's version of "tracing" in order to train your mind what you want to accomplish with your photography.

Keep up the good work can't wait to see more results.
 

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POV Futografee
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2,407 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
^Thanks for all of the input! I was pretty excited to see your name pop up in here... I've had lots of your pics on my PC background!

I started noticing myself that a lot of my pics were up close and personal, but I always feel like I'm going to miss the details in the car if I'm too far back.

As far as the cropping... guilty as charged haha The screen on my camera is just so small! I've also realized that I rush myself a lot while shooting, so I'm sure that has a lot to do with it as well.

I'll definitely look into the bracketing goes, I'll definitely have to look into that. GenCoupeGeek told me about it as well, but I haven't gotten around to learning about it.

Thanks again for the help! :bowdown:
 

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POV Futografee
Joined
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2,407 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I've always liked grayscale pics....


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Accidentally cut off part of his front wheel/tire. Oops, lol. Also, what can I do to cut down on reflections in the paint?


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Still playing the night shots. I hate all the noise in the pics... and I read that it's mostly because of using a high ISO. Anything I should do to cut down on that?...


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