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for the people saying use 5w-30 in summer and 5w-20 in winter that makes no sense because they both are the same weight in the winter...

the 5w is the winter weight

the number after the dash is the summer weight

the polymers in the oil change weight depending on temperature its reversed... the polymers make it heavier in the summer and lighter weight in the winter...

just an FYI... not sure if that was already previously stated but i was reading so many posts where ppl were sayin 5-30 or 5-20 just figured i would clear things up about oil weights...

if you use 5w30 it will be 5 weight in the winter at cold start but when it heats up it will go back to the heavier weight which is after the dash...

hell i shouldn't even say summer and winter weight i should say cold and hot weight lol
 

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for the people saying use 5w-30 in summer and 5w-20 in winter that makes no sense because they both are the same weight in the winter...

the 5w is the winter weight

the number after the dash is the summer weight

the polymers in the oil change weight depending on temperature its reversed... the polymers make it heavier in the summer and lighter weight in the winter...

just an FYI... not sure if that was already previously stated but i was reading so many posts where ppl were sayin 5-30 or 5-20 just figured i would clear things up about oil weights...

if you use 5w30 it will be 5 weight in the winter at cold start but when it heats up it will go back to the heavier weight which is after the dash...

hell i shouldn't even say summer and winter weight i should say cold and hot weight lol




This guy knows more than Bob is the Oil Guy. He is a genius.
 

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Hyundai canada just put down a notice, regardless of oil type, change intervals are 6000km's on 2.0T or 6 months, whichever comes first.
Snoopy, is this a very recent notice? At my dealership they are always trying to get me in to change my 2.0T synthetic oil after 3 months. But I only change it after 6 months because my car doesn't put on alot of kms, and its not in the severe use category, I drive it 90% on the highway. I haven't yet changed the tires either, and I've had the car since June 2009.
 

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Hyundai Canada is a bit weird just fyi, different regions get bulletins and TSB's earlier or later than others for some reason. I had to wait almost 3 months once for something to get replaced under warranty because it wasn't released yet for my region.

I don't know exactly when it was put down, got my oil changed on Thursday and they said it's now 6 months/6000km's where it used to be 3 months/5000km.
Some dealerships are less honest than others, they might just want the service.
 

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My dealer works with me on the transmission fix, they've done a lot for me and in some ways for the community. They're a new dealership with a small customer base so I go to them to change my oil even though I can do it myself. Also... in the winter time, it's a lot easier for them to do it and charge me $20 for time and materials (minus oil) than for me to f*ck around with it at -40.
 

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Just to clarify on the oil weights.

The first number (i.e. 0 or 5 usually) is the cold engine oil weight. When the engine is cold this is the weight of the oil.

The second number (i.e. 20W or 30W usually) is the warm engine oil weight. Once the engine is up to temp is will behave like a straight oil of this weight.

Ideally we would all have a 0 - 'whatever' in for cold start ups as it reduces wear w/ the great flow characteristics of the 0 weight. But there are a couple of catches.

First, if your oil is 85 F when it's cold like a Texas summer the difference between a 0 and a 5 is inconsequential for start up flow.

Second, the wider the spread is between the 2 numbers the more viscocity modifiers they had to use to make that happen, and it will (everything else being equal) behave a little less consistent at high temperatures. A 0-20W (of the same brand and type) will measure a lower overall viscocity than a 5-20W after some useage and will break down quicker.

The only real reason to ever run a thicker oil, like a 10-30W would be because you are seeing dropping oil pressues under hard use. This would only happen after repeated and extended full throttle runs, like at a road race track day. This should never be an issue for a typical use DD car, even one sitting in 105 degree rush hour traffic all day.

If cost be damned, (in a 3.8) I'd run a 0-20W year round and change fairly often. And for track days during a Texas summer I'd switch to a 15-40W (or similiar) just for the track day, then I'd drain it and go right back to the 0-20W.

For those of us w/ more moderate budgets in the South I'd run a 5-20W year around and just change it immediatedly after an average track day.

If I lived back in Denver and still parked vehicles outside I'd run the 0-20W at least for the winter months cause January is a real bitch.

And always synthetics.
 

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I used 0w-40 in my sti year round. It seemed to do the job pretty well. So far the dealer recommended 5w-20 has worked fine for my GC.. thinking about switching to 5w-30 for the summer. I do drive it pretty hard, so i figured I could use the extra protection.
 

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The service rating of passenger car and commercial automotive motor oils is classified by the American Petroleum Institute (API). The program certifies that an oil meets certain Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) quality and performance standards. The service rating is shown in the API "Service Symbol Donut" on the product label.

The labels include two important pieces of information to determine if an engine oil is appropriate for use in your vehicle. The first piece of information speaks to viscosity grade. The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) defines a numerical system for grading motor oils according to viscosity. The suffixes (0, 5, 10, 15 and 25) followed by the letter W designate the engine oil's "winter" grade.

Look to your owner's manual. It specifies the viscosity grade required for your car's engine. Today, the most common grades are 5W-30 and 10W-30.

Watch for the "W"

Whereas the labeling on the bottle of engine oil may suggest the product is a 10W-30, note, if there is no "W" between the 10 and the 30 it may not be a 10W30. As an example, a SAE 10-30 is not the same as an SAE 10W30.

The next 'code" to look for is the API Service Classification. Although it might appear complicated to understand at the start, it is really a simple system to get your arms around. Think of it this way, when cars were first built, the oil they required needed an API SA Service Classification. From there, it moved to SB, SC, SD, and so on (skipping only SI and SK). The current API Service Classification is SN.
 

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Turbocharger Protection
Use of the TEOST 33C deposit bench test is being considered in GF-5 to evaluate Turbocharger Protection.

During this test, problems were observed with oxidative degradation/thermal coking of engine oil in the turbocharger bearing area during hot shut-down. It is necessary to protect the bearing from deposits because deposit build-up in the turbocharger bearing area can lead to loss of engine performance and possibly engine failure.

Turbocharger Protection is important, but there are tradeoffs when it comes to Fuel Economy. The detergent and dispersant components that go the metal surfaces to keep the engine's parts clean and prevent deposit build-up in the turbocharger, compete against the friction modifier components that go to the metal surfaces to reduce friction and improve fuel economy.
 

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Just to clarify on the oil weights.

The first number (i.e. 0 or 5 usually) is the cold engine oil weight. When the engine is cold this is the weight of the oil.

The second number (i.e. 20W or 30W usually) is the warm engine oil weight. Once the engine is up to temp is will behave like a straight oil of this weight.

Ideally we would all have a 0 - 'whatever' in for cold start ups as it reduces wear w/ the great flow characteristics of the 0 weight. But there are a couple of catches.

First, if your oil is 85 F when it's cold like a Texas summer the difference between a 0 and a 5 is inconsequential for start up flow.

Second, the wider the spread is between the 2 numbers the more viscocity modifiers they had to use to make that happen, and it will (everything else being equal) behave a little less consistent at high temperatures. A 0-20W (of the same brand and type) will measure a lower overall viscocity than a 5-20W after some useage and will break down quicker.

The only real reason to ever run a thicker oil, like a 10-30W would be because you are seeing dropping oil pressues under hard use. This would only happen after repeated and extended full throttle runs, like at a road race track day. This should never be an issue for a typical use DD car, even one sitting in 105 degree rush hour traffic all day.

If cost be damned, (in a 3.8) I'd run a 0-20W year round and change fairly often. And for track days during a Texas summer I'd switch to a 15-40W (or similiar) just for the track day, then I'd drain it and go right back to the 0-20W.

For those of us w/ more moderate budgets in the South I'd run a 5-20W year around and just change it immediatedly after an average track day.

If I lived back in Denver and still parked vehicles outside I'd run the 0-20W at least for the winter months cause January is a real bitch.

And always synthetics.
I couldn´t have said this better myself. I run 0w20 full synthetic year round too.

And yes, the intervals are too short and the stealerships take advantage of it. I paid 36 dollars for an oilchange (brought my own oil) last I was in and got a sticker saying come back in 3 months or 3000 miles. Sure...
 

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0W-30 during winter, either 5w-30 or 10w-40 during summer
That's what I would run in the summer, or maybe 10w30, but I feel like my dealer wouldn't like that much.
 

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Here is my oil report Chevron Delo 5w40 synthetic. Chevron on the left, Mobil1 on the right. I would stay away from M1 if I were you. I only use Delo or Rotella T6. Those oils are made for heavy duty diesel engines with turbochargers. Also rated SM for gas engines. I pay $25/gal for the Chevron and $22/gal for the T6.

 

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ther is so much discrepancy between waht everyone is saying.... we shoudl set a poll or something to say when we should get outr oil change. i'm running PR 5-30 so i figure 5k miles is ok
 

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Here is my oil report Chevron Delo 5w40 synthetic. Chevron on the left, Mobil1 on the right. I would stay away from M1 if I were you. I only use Delo or Rotella T6. Those oils are made for heavy duty diesel engines with turbochargers. Also rated SM for gas engines. I pay $25/gal for the Chevron and $22/gal for the T6.
Mobil 1 is what I've been using for years. I have only had one change in this car, but I don't see it causing any problems. I used mobil 1 in my STI, Focus, Civic, Protege, everything pretty much.

Would the Delo be better for the V6 as well, or just the turbo?
 

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They were out of OE 5w-30 when I went to get some oil so I picked up AMSOil signature series 5w-30 instead. It's formulated for 40k km (25k mi). I'm sending the OE oil away for analysis and plan on sending the signature oil away every 5000km as a trend analysis to see how it degrades.


Sent from my Autoguide iPhone app
 

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I'd rather do it myself
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I've used Mobil 1 for a long time and have had several test done on it. All came back OK. If you are using leaded fuel that is a problem with oil. Not the oil.

Nor are the impacts of lead additives on vehicle
engines all positive. Halogen acids derived from lead
salts cause increased corrosion, requiring more
frequent muffler and spark plug replacement and oil
change. Studies carried out after reducing the lead
level of gasoline reported that reduced piston ring and
cylinder-bore wear prevented engine failure and
improved fuel economy (U.S. EPA, 1985).
 
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