Hyundai Genesis Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello everyone, as you can tell, I'm totally new to this forum as well as the car world. I've been interested in the Genesis for a very long time and now realized I can finally buy one for myself very soon. However, I have a dilemma on which trim I should get..

1. I want the 2.0T Auto, but I want all the options RSPEC offers - such as the 19in wheels, brembo brakes, and sports suspension. Question is.. How much extra would the dealership charge me for adding those add-ons?

2. Although many of the "car-enthusiasts" recommend the manual, I just don't think it's worth it for me since I won't be racing and more importantly, its comfortable for the daily-life driver. How many of you guys drive auto?

3. Matter of fact, how difficult is it to learn manual? Is is really not that big of a deal in daily life driving in terms of comfortability as many people with manuals pose?

Apologies for the many question, but responses would be much appreciated!

EDIT: Also, how much is it to switch it to the Genesis emblem?

Thank you so much,

Seville
 

·
Bam-Ba-Lam!!!
Joined
·
2,302 Posts
I say just go for the manual. It's not hard to pick up, you should be good to go in a couple weeks. Dealerships aren't going to add these options on for you. If you wanted to add them yourself you're looking at around $5000. In my opinion, just learn to drive a manual, its way more fun once you get it down.
 

·
FS section ravager
Joined
·
2,183 Posts
1. They won't do it, you will have to do it yourself, and it will cost much more than the difference between the two models (not to mention no LSD)

2. I have a 2.0T R-Spec Manual

3. Easy, the hard part is getting going, then getting going smoothly.

4. Depends on which one you go with, but not too expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
880 Posts
Before you jump to manual stop and think if your in traffic everyday, which is the only time I curse the damn thing! Other than that the manual is easy, picked it up in a couple days myself. As mentioned on here getting going is the difficult part, especially starting upward on a hill with someone on your ass >.<

As for the track bits you get with the r spec, it's more than worth it. What year are you looking at? Bc if its a first gen then you can get a 2.0t track auto and have all those options although its going to be older......I think 09, 10. If its a 13 then yeah I see you dilemma :(. You also lose cc on the r spec :/


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

·
FS section ravager
Joined
·
2,183 Posts
.... As mentioned on here getting going is the difficult part, especially starting upward on a hill with someone on your ass >.<...
When in doubt, drop the clutch :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
I have the 8 speed auto and i love it but leaning stick isn't much harder then learning to drive. My car is my daily driver and i can't drive it enough! The dealer would just suggest you buy an rspec since you would ve payong them more for it.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
3. Matter of fact, how difficult is it to learn manual? Is is really not that big of a deal in daily life driving in terms of comfortability as many people with manuals pose?
From My experience and the experience I have with teaching people to drive a manual transmission it is simple. I learned on My dad 89 Mustang GT in the driveway. Long story short I backed up out the garage and forgot to disengage the parking brake. I spent about 45 minutes to a hours trying to get the car to go with no luck. Once the parking brake was disengaged and I tried again I had no problem with starting out. If you have a friend/someone you know that has a manual transmission see if they can let you practice in a parking lot just to start out. Shifting gears are simple the transmission is designed to do most of the work when it comes to shifting to the next highest gear.

I personally do not like to drive automatics, they are less fun. But the only time it becomes lets say annoying is when there is a 10 mile road work zone where you do nothing but creeping moves.

As for the RSPEC "upgrades" they are only worth it if you do not plan on changing any of it. If you plan on changing the wheels with aftermarket don't need stock 19s if you plan on putting coil-overs not need for "Tuned Suspension" and I believe there is a thread on what you need/how to do the Brembo Brake Conversion.

BTW I was 14 when I was learning on my dads car :p
 

·
FS section ravager
Joined
·
2,183 Posts
From My experience and the experience I have with teaching people to drive a manual transmission it is simple. I learned on My dad 89 Mustang GT in the driveway. Long story short I backed up out the garage and forgot to disengage the parking brake. I spent about 45 minutes to a hours trying to get the car to go with no luck. Once the parking brake was disengaged and I tried again I had no problem with starting out. If you have a friend/someone you know that has a manual transmission see if they can let you practice in a parking lot just to start out. Shifting gears are simple the transmission is designed to do most of the work when it comes to shifting to the next highest gear.

I personally do not like to drive automatics, they are less fun. But the only time it becomes lets say annoying is when there is a 10 mile road work zone where you do nothing but creeping moves.

As for the RSPEC "upgrades" they are only worth it if you do not plan on changing any of it. If you plan on changing the wheels with aftermarket don't need stock 19s if you plan on putting coil-overs not need for "Tuned Suspension" and I believe there is a thread on what you need/how to do the Brembo Brake Conversion.

BTW I was 14 when I was learning on my dads car :p

You can swap the Brembos and LSD, but the difference in those two items alone will cost more than the bump up in model pricing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
You can swap the Brembos and LSD, but the difference in those two items alone will cost more than the bump up in model pricing.
True but how many people truly use the LSD? Unless you drive it like you stole it or run it on a Road Course/Drift most people will never notice non-lsd or lsd rear end.
 

·
xFa
Joined
·
446 Posts
dont learn to drive a stick on a brand new car. buy the auto, skip the bells and whistles.
 

·
xFa
Joined
·
446 Posts
True but how many people truly use the LSD? Unless you drive it like you stole it or run it on a Road Course/Drift most people will never notice non-lsd or lsd rear end.
guess i drive it like i stole it. i wish i had the LSD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
I notice it.. lol and so does every slammed car that has to go up a driveway or two.

Trust me driving fast around the course isnt the only benefit to a LSD



True but how many people truly use the LSD? Unless you drive it like you stole it or run it on a Road Course/Drift most people will never notice non-lsd or lsd rear end.
 

·
Designerd
Joined
·
85 Posts
I went with the auto because I might end up in San Francisco and this being my first new car I'd hate to destroy the clutch haha Auto is still a lot of fun but I do wish I had those Brembo brakes and LSD. If the R-spec features really mean a lot to you just save up for that trim because otherwise you're looking at a lot of $$$$ to add them yourself. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
If you can wait, learn to drive the manual. Don't do it on a new car, especially a sports car. It's a lot easier to learn on a regular car. A LOT easier. Heck, I stalled an SS a few times getting it into first during a test drive before I figured out that clutch & how much engine revs to give it.

I stalled my new 3.8 reversing today. Kind of embarrassing.

Moral of the story, not easy to learn to drive a manual sports car. Very easy to drive a manual regular car.

Also, the hardest part is getting it rolling. Once it's rolling, no problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
I'll share my experience with you on the auto vs. manual thing...

When I started getting into cars, I was initially into American cars (still am, though I'm more diverse now). I bought an automatic Mustang, followed by two automatic Camaros. Every time I upgraded to a faster car and while I had more fun than the last car, I was always disappointed I didn't take the plunge and get a stick (I didn't know how to drive it).

Finally I decided I was going to buy a new GTO and that if I was going to spend $30K on a brand new car, it was going to be what I REALLY wanted. I had my father drive the car home from the dealer and then I took the keys and taught myself to drive it.

I've bought 3 other new cars since that GTO and all have been manual.

What is your daily commute like? Is it bumper to bumper traffic or does it move relatively normally? any highway involved?

The clutch in the Genesis is very light and the travel is short. Also, despite having a small engine, the car is more resistant to bogging and stalling from a standing start than a lot of cars I've driven (definitely the easiest to get moving that wasn't a large, torquey V8).

Aside from the fear of driving a stick daily, it comes down to whether you're really INTERESTED in driving a manual sports car. If you really WANT the stick but you're gun shy about learning and driving it in traffic, I can pretty much assure you, it would be worth it to get the manual. If you're going to spend the money on a new car, don't settle.

Driving a sporty manual car on the street isn't about "racing" really. It's about enjoying the act of driving and enjoying the control over the function of the car. I know for me, I actually just LIKE being involved with the drive, even if it's just around the corner to the store or something.

On the other hand, if you really don't care about driving a manual, save some cash, get a base 2.0T automatic and put some nice 19" aftermarket wheels/tires and suspension bits on it. Big brakes are EXPENSIVE, whether you go with OEM Brembos or an aftermarket kit so you have to decide how much you really want them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
40,514 Posts
True but how many people truly use the LSD? Unless you drive it like you stole it or run it on a Road Course/Drift most people will never notice non-lsd or lsd rear end.
Incorrect. If you have ever been in a situation (snow, ice, or mud) where one wheel spins and the other doesn't, you could have probably used a LSD to get out. LSD prevents all the power from being transmitted to just one drive wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'll share my experience with you on the auto vs. manual thing...

When I started getting into cars, I was initially into American cars (still am, though I'm more diverse now). I bought an automatic Mustang, followed by two automatic Camaros. Every time I upgraded to a faster car and while I had more fun than the last car, I was always disappointed I didn't take the plunge and get a stick (I didn't know how to drive it).

Finally I decided I was going to buy a new GTO and that if I was going to spend $30K on a brand new car, it was going to be what I REALLY wanted. I had my father drive the car home from the dealer and then I took the keys and taught myself to drive it.

I've bought 3 other new cars since that GTO and all have been manual.

What is your daily commute like? Is it bumper to bumper traffic or does it move relatively normally? any highway involved?

The clutch in the Genesis is very light and the travel is short. Also, despite having a small engine, the car is more resistant to bogging and stalling from a standing start than a lot of cars I've driven (definitely the easiest to get moving that wasn't a large, torquey V8).

Aside from the fear of driving a stick daily, it comes down to whether you're really INTERESTED in driving a manual sports car. If you really WANT the stick but you're gun shy about learning and driving it in traffic, I can pretty much assure you, it would be worth it to get the manual. If you're going to spend the money on a new car, don't settle.

Driving a sporty manual car on the street isn't about "racing" really. It's about enjoying the act of driving and enjoying the control over the function of the car. I know for me, I actually just LIKE being involved with the drive, even if it's just around the corner to the store or something.

On the other hand, if you really don't care about driving a manual, save some cash, get a base 2.0T automatic and put some nice 19" aftermarket wheels/tires and suspension bits on it. Big brakes are EXPENSIVE, whether you go with OEM Brembos or an aftermarket kit so you have to decide how much you really want them.
Thanks for the response! Can you provide links to any good aftermarket shops for the 19in wheels? Also, what is a LSD?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
40,514 Posts
Limited Slip Differential. On high powered cars where the power of the car can overcome the friction of a single wheel, a LSD ensures that the power is not entirely routed to the slipping wheel. This improves the handling characteristics of the car (less fishtailing) as well as improves high power launches by redirecting the engine power to the wheel that has traction instead of spinning the wheel that does not. The differential is the pumpkin in the middle of the rear axle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
Thanks for the response! Can you provide links to any good aftermarket shops for the 19in wheels? Also, what is a LSD?
Check the wheel and tire section. All the forum vendors who sell wheels periodically post up in there. I'm sure you'll be able to get some ideas about which wheels you might like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
974 Posts
Personally I would learn how to drive a stick before buying that car lol.. I bought my tiburon 4 years ago and didn't know how drive a stick made my life hell for a bit. I would also get an rspec, I'm actually getting one pretty soon, I'm getting an awesome deal out of it.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top