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World Industries Ace, a Korea-based powertrain company affiliated with Hyundai Kia Motor Groupe produces the M6VR-series transmissions in their factory in Asan, Chungcheongnamdo, Korea, with Magna Powertrain which is an operating unit of Canada-based Magna International Inc.
The first production of the transmission was produced in house at the Asan Assembly Plant (HKMG) in South Korea, those transmissions included an incorrectly spec'd shift linkage and plastic bushings.
In early 2010 Magna Powertrain and WIA started producing the GC's transmission in their joint facility also in Asan, SoKo and followed with several warranty claims issued an investigation on the transmission. This was spear headed by the Canadian division of Hyundai Motor Group in association with Magna Powertrain (since they're both in the same country). Several changes were made based on feedback from technicians and testers and those made it into late production 2011 MT GC's. Further changes were introduced in 2013 though mostly related to the clutch and flywheel assembly, neither of which are produced by WIA, HMG or MPI.

How you can call a source reliable when they don't even know who actually produces the product astounds me.

Carbon is self-lubricating and is excellent as a low impact bearing or friction seal, however, in an engine or transmission as a high impact wear piece would be broken in a heart beat. The Carbon synchros used by Tremec in their line up of T6060 or T56 transmissions are not self-lubricating as they're a carbon composite and thus lose their ability to self-lube, they would have to be a form of carbon composite because unless it's diamond, carbon is brittle and cannot take impact very well, exactly what a synchro needs to do on a constant basis.

Hyundai hasn't even started to use aluminum in their frames (with no intentions of it), the chance they'll put carbon composite synchro's in an economy GT car is laughable. More than likely if they'll use carbon it'll be a carbon coated high load bronze synchro. But more than likely they'll continue to use a babot ceramic friction surface and simply replace the brass with bronze, why, because it's cheap.

Added info, the 2010 flywheel, clutch and pressure plate are all made by LUK a division of Schaeffler Group, regardless of engine. The 2013 saw the change to PHC Valeo for both engines, a joint venture of the leading manufacturer of clutch assemblies VALEO (France) and a South Korean company PYEONG HWA VALEO.
 

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lol here we go
 

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, SJ is the man
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Thanks for deleting my second to last reply. What's the matter snoop? You can't admit that someone else may know more about a particular subject than you. Are you mad that I called you out for basically whipping your dong and flashing your 2 inches of fury?
Furious is to say the least. Have you seen the floods up there lately? Dude took a piss. You know how they love poutine? He makes the gravy for all of Canada himself. That little pecker flies at such a speed, that it creates it's own black hole. Only equaled by the gravitational pull his giant nuts provide. ALL BALLS. You don't want to mess with that. It's just too different.
 

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I drive a V6
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Furious is to say the least. Have you seen the floods up there lately? Dude took a piss. You know how they love poutine? He makes the gravy for all of Canada himself. That little pecker flies at such a speed, that it creates it's own black hole. Only equaled by the gravitational pull his giant nuts provide. ALL BALLS. You don't want to mess with that. It's just too different.
I dont get it...but this made me laugh LOL

...btw im never eating poutine again, i dont care how hung over i am haha
 

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2010-12 2.0T uses the Hyundai M6VR1 transmission.
2010-12 3.8 uses the Hyundai M6VR2 transmission.

M6VR1 and M6VR2 are more ore less identical except for gear ratios, and starter location. Apparently, Hyundai made tweaks to the transmission internals for better reliability throughout production. Even with the changes, it seems to not be the most reliable transmission.

All 2013s use the M6VR2 transmission. It's largely the same as the 10-12 M6VR2 transmission, but I believe it has somewhat upgraded internals.

This is all covered in excruciating detail in these 2 threads:
OFFICIAL THREAD: Manual Transmission Issues
Manual Transmission development thread
Do you think a 2013 3.8L clutch would fit in a 2011 3.8L? I need to replace my clutch on my 2011 3.8 but there is big price gap between the 2010-2012 and the 2013-2016 clutches
2010-12 2.0T uses the Hyundai M6VR1 transmission.
2010-12 3.8 uses the Hyundai M6VR2 transmission.

M6VR1 and M6VR2 are more ore less identical except for gear ratios, and starter location. Apparently, Hyundai made tweaks to the transmission internals for better reliability throughout production. Even with the changes, it seems to not be the most reliable transmission.

All 2013s use the M6VR2 transmission. It's largely the same as the 10-12 M6VR2 transmission, but I believe it has somewhat upgraded internals.

This is all covered in excruciating detail in these 2 threads:
OFFICIAL THREAD: Manual Transmission Issues
Manual Transmission development thread
Do you think a 2013 3.8L clutch would fit in a 2011 3.8L? I need to replace my clutch on my 2011 3.8 but there is big price gap between the 2010-2012 and the 2013-2016 clutches
 
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