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I've been driving my RWD Genesis for 4 years and never had an issue getting around but this last month has been an absolute nightmare, the ridiculous snowfall we're getting combined with no longer having underground parking has made the car unmanageable as it's 50/50 if it gets stuck anytime I park.

So I need to make a choice, either buy a winter beater with AWD, buy a new car (which is unlikely) or maybe get a limited slip diff and see if that makes the difference. I love the car so I really don't want to get rid of it and it's been an absolute dream reliability wise. I just need to figure something out to get through months like this (I've been stuck 2 times in 4 years before this month. This month alone I've been badly stuck 4 or 5 times and I'm assuming so long as I park on the street that number will only increase).

So has anyone here ever purchased an aftermarket diff? How much labor are we looking at for the install as I imagine it would be a pretty big job? Will it make enough of a difference to get me through these ridiculous snowfall days?

Thanks guys.
 

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Advenio Pariter
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I bought a set of winter tires and rims when I bought the car. I pass people on the way to work. They are not a panacea, but I have not problem getting around as long as I get a little traction. My car is a year-around vehicle. 102k miles and I still like driving it. Nice balance and totally reliable.
 

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labour on diff probably about 3.5 from shop , so depending do the math
 

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Plus one on winter tires! A good set of legit snow tires will help you a lot more with your traction issues than an LSD. We run Michelin Xi3 winter tires on Project Hoondy and they have never let us down.

The issue with using an LSD to improve traction in the snow is that all of the less expensive models are "helical" style LSDs that aren't really helpful in those conditions. Both the Torsen LSD that comes standard on the Track Pack Genesis Coupe as well as the popular Quaife after-market LSD are helical types.

A helical LSD, like the Torsen or Quaife, is not a "locking" differential. They have no ability to actually lock the rear wheels together. Instead, they work as a "torque biasing" differential. They direct more of the engine's torque towards whichever wheel has more grip.

That behavior is fantastic for a sports car and does a lot to improve handling. However, these helical LSD's only work if the car is already moving. If the car isn't in motion, or if one of the drive wheels becomes unloaded, then a helical diff will work just like a regular, "open" diff and spin all the power away on the wheel with less grip.

This makes helical LSDs all but useless during a standing start on a slippery surface. A helical LSD is helpful in the snow as long as the car is in motion and neither of the drive wheels has broken loose, but as soon as the car stops or one of the wheels starts to spin the helical LSD stops working and it might as well be a regular open diff at that point.

The only type of LSD that is truly helpful in such situations is a Salisbury or "clutch-type" LSD. These LSD's use a clutch pack that squeezes down on the center section of the diff when drive torque is applied, thus splitting the torque evenly between both drive wheels. This means the diff is working any time torque is being sent from the engine to the wheels and, in the case of 2.0-way and 1.5-way diffs, it is also working any time torque is being sent from the wheels to the engine. It works during standing starts, down-shifts, acceleration, deceleration, etc.

I will be the first to say that Salisbury LSD's are cool as hell and more Genesis Coupe owners should consider using them. I will also be the first to say that Salisbury LSD's are an incredibly expensive pain in the ass that take time, knowledge, and plenty of money to work properly on a street car. Even a mildly configured Salisbury LSD is a vicious, brutal device that introduces all kinds of new, strange, sometimes unsettling noises and vibrations into the chassis.

It will drag the inside wheel, it will chew on gravel , it will eat up rear tires, it will scare your girlfriend:


The driving experience is simply unlike any other type of car. Nothing feels like a Salisbury LSD, they are almost spooky in their operation. We love ours, but it definitely isn't for everyone.

If you are truly interested, I wrote a series of articles about after-market differentials for the Genesis Coupe which culminated in our own Cusco RS Salisbury differential build:

https://oppositelock.kinja.com/choosing-our-perfect-lsd-1783113353

https://oppositelock.kinja.com/you-spent-how-much-on-a-diff-1771141687

https://oppositelock.kinja.com/assembling-the-beast-1770827220

https://oppositelock.kinja.com/we-love-it-when-a-build-comes-together-1783783351



Long story short: it cost $2500 for us to acquire, modify, and install a Cusco RS Salisbury LSD in such a way that it would be tolerable for daily driving. This included the use of WPC treatment, a super-trick metal-improvement process that is employed almost exclusively by professional race teams.

If you want improved handling characteristics and more grip on the move I would suggest picking up a used Torsen LSD from a salvage parts dealer. You can get them for about $600-$800. The nice thing is that you buy it as a complete diff housing assembly that's all ready to go. This makes it very simple to install, you just remove your old "pumpkin" and swap in the new one.

If you want better grip in snowy, slushy, nasty conditions then look into some proper winter tires. Winter tires and a Torsen LSD would be a dramatic improvement with the tires helping stationary and low-speed traction while the LSD helps everywhere else.

Only if you have a deep hankering for mad performance driving should you look into a clutch-type LSD like we did. It is such an expensive hassle I would not say it is worth it for improved winter traction alone. It only makes sense if you truly crave the sort of hairy-chested driving experience that a Salisbury LSD provides.

Good luck, happy tuning!
 

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I am impressed with the accurate and very useful information that StrangeLiform consistently provides on this forum. StrangeLiform knows his stuff, and once again provides the information that the Original Poster (patmmusic) requires.

The best solution for rear-wheel-drive in snow and on ice is proper tires. You will enjoy the best driving experience with rear-wheel-drive in snow and on ice if you mount stud-less snow tires. You should mount the snow tires at all four corners because you need to stop (and turn) as well as go.

I drive in snow and on ice during Minnesota winters. My car has an excellent LSD and I mount a dedicated snow tire/wheel setup during the winter months. Truthfully my winter stud-less snow tires are much more effective than the car’s LSD. In fact, I often turn OFF the LSD because it causes lateral sliding when I am trying to advance forward.
--Spike
 

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shorttrack
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To note, those having the OEM Torsen LSD on their Gen Coupe's.If you get into a situation of the rear tires spinning in mud ,snow just pull the E brake a little and the torsen will send power to both rear wheels .This works good on driveways when 1 tire is spinning and the other tire will not catch traction .
 

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shorttrack
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The torsen is a PITA at times but I managed high 11's in the 1/4, so it does work well when the pavement has adhesion .
 
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In Charge of Snacks
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I always end up having to remember this trick via frustration and trial and error in Sierra Winters. And I use "Winter" loosely here, as I usually end up getting stuck in snow/slush/ice around Early October and May. I'm not dumb enough to take Summer rubber into the mountains during real Winter.

To OP: Forget the diff for now. Everything everybody above has said is reasonable differential advice. However, tires will be of much greater service to you. Alternatively, you might look into having a semi disposable traction solution stored in your trunk for cold weather emergencies like I do. Several companies make snow socks, ratchet strap-on urethane ribs for your tires, low profile quick install chains, etc. Sure, these aren't legal in most North American jurisdictions, but they can save you great hassle and pain, maybe even save your life. Be mindful of brake caliper clearance if you like the through-wheel variety.

Check this stuff out
 

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I really don't understand how some people will spend thousands on rims/tires , exhausts ect...yet drive their Genny in harsh winter conditions with snow, ice and salt.
...It only makes smart sense to store the coupe for the winter. It keeps the mileage down, condition and resale value up. I would buy a beater for the winter. My coupe is 8 years old and just turned 62,000 miles. Plus..my insurance goes down drastically for the 6 months its in winter storage. My winter beater is a 03 ford ranger 4x4. Why take the chance of someone sliding into you...or you yourself losing control on icy roads and wrecking the car?
 

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I agree entirely, however being from the rust belt originaly, (Chicago suburbs), I had friends growing up who purchased winter beaters and rented garages for their nice cars but it was not something I could afford at that time. Now my Coupe is my toy and lives in my garage until I want to play with it, I'm lucky to have four other cars to choose from, but it sure wasn't always that way.
 

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If one looks hard enough you can normally find deals on winter storage. I was paying $100 per month for a heated spot for several winters until the owner decided to sell the building.
...This winter I really got lucky. I found a spot in a newly renovated garage where the floors are so clean you could eat off of them. Heated, full security and parked with a few Shelby gt's for $60/ month..lol
...I know a few guys around here with nice fast cars who store them in the winter and buy $500-$600 beaters just to get them through the winter months. If your going to spend that on winter tires alone to winter drive it....just park the Genny and buy a beater.
 
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