Hyundai Genesis Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
My question is how high horsepower are you going? And is sleeving still better alternative for very high hp builds as it stregthens the cylinder walls. Also, could there be adverse effects by "filling in" due to possibly something as simple as heat retention.

If you are just going for a mild build, not sure I would worry about altering the block at all.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,133 Posts
My question is how high horsepower are you going? And is sleeving still better alternative for very high hp builds as it stregthens the cylinder walls. Also, could there be adverse effects by "filling in" due to possibly something as simple as heat retention.

If you are just going for a mild build, not sure I would worry about altering the block at all.
Its not going to retain heat, that's what the coolant flowing around the cylinders is for.

And they aren't "filling in" the coolant passages, they are just adding a plate around the top of the cylinders.
The cooling done above the block is just for the head and the coolant has to pass through the head gasket which obviously isn't "open deck"



This isn't resleeving the block.

From what I have read all the engine failures for this engine have been from internals breaking and bearing failures.

From other engines, failure due to it being open deck shows up as a headgasket failure as far as I researched.

What is available for a closed deck replacement are only darton sleeves, from what I know. That involves milling/boring out the entire cylinder and pressing in the sleeves.
Darton sleeves for our car are only o-ring sealed, not epoxy sealed from what I've read, so they are floating slightly.

OEM, they cast the block machine and bored it, then they press/epoxy the steel sleeve in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Yeah I'm only looking for 500ish and like AKGC said i haven't seen one instance of cylinder failure on here (except when a rod goes through one). Wrex has been building strip and track cars for years and they do warranty there CSS work to 500hp, but I've seen higher HP builds that don't have any problems. Heres Pic of it on a Honda. https://www.facebook.com/kineticaut...741830.261773751476/10154517673591477/?type=3
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,133 Posts
Is that an interference fit, or do they epoxy it in?

Since one of my engines is stripped down. I might send it in.

The block only weights like 50~60 pounds.
 

·
In Charge of Snacks
Joined
·
2,109 Posts
The Subaru guys swear by this process. I was looking into it before, but it severely limits overboring. You're pretty much stuck with stock bores if you do a drop in deck girdle like this. Simply not enough metal left at the mating surface. But yes, this is good stuff. And it's as good for high RPM and high compression as it is for boost. It mitigates deformation and deflection of the cylinders at the heads brought on by pressure as well as by vibration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
[/HTML]
Is that an interference fit, or do they epoxy it in?

Since one of my engines is stripped down. I might send it in.

The block only weights like 50~60 pounds.
Good question I think its epoxied but Im not sure i didn't ask him when I emailed him. But from this
notice the crust around the CSS looks like dried epoxy. You can always email the guy at Werx [email protected] hes been very helpful to me so far.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,133 Posts
FYI neither process is better or worse (unless they use the typical epoxy any one can get from the grocery store).

The interference fit is interesting though. They mill it to a really tight fit and then freeze the "ring" (don't know what it's actually called), drop it in and let it come up to room temp.
It put's more lateral stress on the block though, but there is a good half inch of wall around it, so it's not much of an issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
subd
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top