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lovin my 300+hp hyundai
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I'm getting stainless steel mesh hoses installed, and when they flush the break line, what's a good break fluid to put in? I'm going to supply my own. I only know oil, never dealt with break fluid. I have stock brembo's with ark slotted & drilled rotors and Hawk HPS pads.
 

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Out Pissing Off cops!
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I used ATe's SuperBlue, it's dot 4 and well Blue, so easy to flush the old fluid out since you keep going until it's blue.

I paid 20$ for a 1L can. It's enough to do the complete brake lines/Clutch line flush BTW.

BTW it's BRAKES not breaks.;)
 

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I used ATe's SuperBlue, it's dot 4 and well Blue, so easy to flush the old fluid out since you keep going until it's blue.

I paid 20$ for a 1L can. It's enough to do the complete brake lines/Clutch line flush BTW.

BTW it's BRAKES not breaks.;)
I wanted to go with a DOT4 or DOT5.1 fluid,but I wanted to make sure it was one that looked like whats in there more or less. I know that so the manual says DOT 3 or 4 and therefore so long as I can show them the bottle that says it meets those specs,whatever I use is my own buisiness. Still,I dont want to give them excuses,especially with all the touble I have been having with mine.

THIS is actually the exact sort of thing that the Magnuson Moss Warranty act protects you against BTW. Its not there to protect you if you decide to upgrade the turbo or intercooler,but instead protectes you for instance if you do PM and replace an oil filter with a different brand or use a different brand of fluid or libricant it so long as it meets the specs they recomend,your warranty is supposed to be unaffected. You can have it done by a mechanic or even do it yourself and unless you screw something up like leave the drain plug or filter loose. Still,I can imagine having a brake problem and the dealer taking one look at the blue fluid and refusing to fix it and then I would have to fight them over it.

I guess my question comes down to,whats a good fluid to use that looks like the original. Ive heard others recomend the blue stuff. Is it particularly better than the others? If its particularly better,I wont worry to much and just go with it,but if theres something just as good that wont stick out like a sore thumb,then I would go with that.
 

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Sex Machine
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I used ATe's SuperBlue, it's dot 4 and well Blue, so easy to flush the old fluid out since you keep going until it's blue.

I paid 20$ for a 1L can. It's enough to do the complete brake lines/Clutch line flush BTW.

BTW it's BRAKES not breaks.;)
I got the same fluid for my Brembo's and I can't wait to test it out with my new SS lines and pads. And I like how the brake fluid comes in orange also, so u can switch back and forth between flushes so ur reservoir doesn't get a blue stain over time.
 

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motul rbf600 here
 

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GenSport Carolinas
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I'm getting stainless steel mesh hoses installed, and when they flush the break line, what's a good break fluid to put in? I'm going to supply my own. I only know oil, never dealt with break fluid. I have stock brembo's with ark slotted & drilled rotors and Hawk HPS pads.
What SS lines did you buy and where? Looking forward to hearing your feedback on how these turn out.
 

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Out Pissing Off cops!
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I got the same fluid for my Brembo's and I can't wait to test it out with my new SS lines and pads. And I like how the brake fluid comes in orange also, so u can switch back and forth between flushes so ur reservoir doesn't get a blue stain over time.
^^Maintenance made easy by our German friends once again!!

@~20$ a can, you can't go around this.
 

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FUNCTION OVER FORM
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Running Motul 660, KPR SS lines & Frixa pads here, but I would recommend the ATe SuperBlue due to the much better value since the Motul 660 & even 600 is rather expensive.

BTW, don't worry about DOT 3 or 4 & instead look at the temperature rating on the bottle showing what the fluid is good up to. The DOT rating doesn't always directly coincide with the temps at which the fluid is good up to anyway. Lastly, I believe DOT5 is a special fluid used for show cars & should not be used on DD or tracked vehicles.
 

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Iirc dot 5 is for non abs braking systems only.

I wanted to go with a DOT4 or DOT5.1 fluid,but I wanted to make sure it was one that looked like whats in there more or less. I know that so the manual says DOT 3 or 4 and therefore so long as I can show them the bottle that says it meets those specs,whatever I use is my own buisiness. Still,I dont want to give them excuses,especially with all the touble I have been having with mine.

THIS is actually the exact sort of thing that the Magnuson Moss Warranty act protects you against BTW. Its not there to protect you if you decide to upgrade the turbo or intercooler,but instead protectes you for instance if you do PM and replace an oil filter with a different brand or use a different brand of fluid or libricant it so long as it meets the specs they recomend,your warranty is supposed to be unaffected. You can have it done by a mechanic or even do it yourself and unless you screw something up like leave the drain plug or filter loose. Still,I can imagine having a brake problem and the dealer taking one look at the blue fluid and refusing to fix it and then I would have to fight them over it.

I guess my question comes down to,whats a good fluid to use that looks like the original. Ive heard others recomend the blue stuff. Is it particularly better than the others? If its particularly better,I wont worry to much and just go with it,but if theres something just as good that wont stick out like a sore thumb,then I would go with that.
 

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Little info I found online:

Using DOT 5 in a DOT 3 or DOT 4 system without proper flushing will cause damage to the seals and cause brake failure. DOT 5 brake fluid is not compatible with anti-lock brake systems.


DOT 5 brake fluid absorbs a small amount of air requiring care when bleeding the system of air.
 

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Gooood! GOOOOOD!
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^^ You beat me to it. lol

I sell Stoptech SS brake lines. They're the best on the market IMO. Agency stuff wears over time and I've never had a complaint about Stoptech's lines.
 

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FUNCTION OVER FORM
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Little info I found online:

Using DOT 5 in a DOT 3 or DOT 4 system without proper flushing will cause damage to the seals and cause brake failure. DOT 5 brake fluid is not compatible with anti-lock brake systems.


DOT 5 brake fluid absorbs a small amount of air requiring care when bleeding the system of air.
But, I've read that the DOT5 is supposed to not be harmful to paint, hence why show vehicles use it.
 

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Maybe since a true show vehicle doesn't drive on the street it doesn't matter. All I know is on dot 5 bottles it say don't use with abs systems.
 

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FUNCTION OVER FORM
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Maybe since a true show vehicle doesn't drive on the street it doesn't matter. All I know is on dot 5 bottles it say don't use with abs systems.
Yeah, I imagine you're right since most of these vehicles are trailer queens & get pushed as much as driven..:D
 

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Sex Machine
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^^Maintenance made easy by our German friends once again!!

@~20$ a can, you can't go around this.
Hell yeah lol... Where did u end up buying ur can? I wish they carried that locally in my city :(
 

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Out Pissing Off cops!
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Hell yeah lol... Where did u end up buying ur can? I wish they carried that locally in my city :(
@ Perry Auto, right next to where I live. They always have cans of that stuff, along with all the Redline fluids like the mt90 and shock products and such...
 

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Sex Machine
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I guess I better start calling around my city or else I gotta keep buying the fluid online.

I actually have a Perry Automotive coupon for $50 that I won during my Auto-X competition lol. I can't believe I forgot about it.
 

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NEVER NEVER EVER use dot 5 on daily drivers. Has a lot to do with fluid durability...only for race cars who get new BRAKE fluid every race.
 

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FUNCTION OVER FORM
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Here is a pretty informative tid bit I found

Automotive brake fluid has many responsibilities. Corrosion protection and lubrication of brake system components are only a portion of the role brake fluid must play.

All automobiles that have a hydraulic braking system must use brake fluid in order for the brake system to operate. The type of fluid used can depend on the type of vehicle and the demands of the vehicles brake system.

The two most common brake fluids used in the automotive industry are fluids that contain Polyalkylene Glycol Ether and fluid that contains Silicone or Silicium-based Polymer. Both Fluids are common but very different in regards to the manner in which they perform. Fluids containing Polyalklene Glycol Ether are more widely used and are the only fluids that should be used in racing brake systems.

Because brake systems may reach extreme temperatures brake fluid must have the ability to withstand these temperatures and not degrade rapidly.

SILICONE BASED FLUID
Fluids containing Silicone are generally used in military type vehicles and because Silicone based fluids will not damage painted surfaces they are also somewhat common in show cars.

Silicone-based fluids are regarded as DOT 5 fluids. They are highly compressible and can give the driver a feeling of a spongy pedal. The higher the brake system temperature the more the compressibility of the fluid and this increases the feeling of a spongy pedal.

Silicone based fluids are non-hydroscopic meaning that they will not absorb or mix with water. When water is present in the brake system it will create a water/fluid/water/fluid situation. Because water boils at approximately 212º F, the ability of the brake system to operate correctly decreases, and the steam created from boiling water adds air to the system. It is important to remember that water may be present in any brake system. Therefore silicone brake fluid lacks the ability to deal with moisture and will dramatically decrease a brake systems performance.


POLYGLYCOL ETHER BASED FLUIDS
Fluids containing Poly glycol ethers are regarded as DOT 3, 4, and DOT 5.1. These type fluids are hydroscopic meaning they have an ability to mix with water and still perform adequately. However, water will drastically reduce the boiling point of fluid. In a passenger car this is not an issue. In a racecar it is a major issue because as the boiling point decreases the performance ability of the fluid also decreases.

Poly glycol type fluids are 2 times less compressible than silicone type fluids, even when heated. Less compressibility of brake fluid will increase pedal feel. Changing fluid on a regular basis will greatly increase the performance of the brake system.

FLUID SPECIFICATIONS All brake fluids must meet federal standard #116. Under this standard is three Department of Transportation (DOT) minimal specifications for brake fluid. They are DOT 3, DOT 4, and DOT 5.1 (for fluids based with Polyalkylene Glycol Ether) and DOT 5 (for Silicone based fluids).

MINIMAL boiling points for these specifications are as follows:

Dry Boiling Point Wet Boiling Point
DOT 3 401ºF 284º F

DOT 4 446º F 311º F
DOT 5 500º F 356º F
DOT 5.1 518º F 375º F

Racing brake fluids always exceeds the DOT specifications for dry boiling points. Wet boiling points generally remain the same.

DOT 3 VS. DOT 4 and 5.1
AFCO's 570º brake fluid is a DOT 3 type fluid. However, it has a dry boiling point that is 52º higher than DOT 5.1 specifications, 124º higher than DOT 4 specifications and 169º higher than DOT 3 specifications. AFCO's 570º fluid meets or exceeds all DOT 3, 4, and 5.1 lubrication, corrosion protection and viscosity specifications.

AFCO's 570º racing fluid meets but does not exceed federal standards for wet boiling point specification; therefore, its classification is DOT 3. Because AFCO's 570º fluid is intended for use in racing type brake systems that undergo frequent fluid changes, exceeding federal standards for wet boiling points is of little concern. Racing brake fluids always exceeds the DOT specifications for dry boiling points. Wet boiling points generally remain the same.

WET VS. DRY BOILING POINT
The term boiling point when used regarding brake fluid means the temperatures that brake fluid will begin to boil.

WET BOILING POINT
The minimum temperatures that brake fluids will begin to boil when the brake system contains 3% water by volume of the system.

DRY BOILING POINT
The temperatures that brake fluid will boil with no water present in the system.

MOISTURE IN THE BRAKE SYSTEM
Water/moisture can be found in nearly all brake systems. Moisture enters the brake system in several ways. One of the more common ways is from using old or pre-opened fluid. Keep in mind, that brake fluid draws in moisture from the surrounding air. Tightly sealing brake fluid bottles and not storing them for long periods of time will help keep moisture out. When changing or bleeding brake fluid always replace master cylinder caps as soon as possible to prevent moisture from entering into the master cylinder. Condensation, (small moisture droplets) can form in lines and calipers. As caliper and line temperatures heat up and then cool repeatedly, condensation occurs, leaving behind an increase in moisture/water. Over time the moisture becomes trapped in the internal sections of calipers, lines, master cylinders, etc. When this water reaches 212º F the water turns to steam. Many times air in the brake system is a result of water that has turned to steam. The build up of steam will create air pressure in the system, sometimes to the point that enough pressure is created to push caliper pistons into the brake pad. This will create brake drag as the rotor and pads make contact and can also create more heat in the system. Diffusion is another way in that water/moisture may enter the system.

Diffusion occurs when over time moisture enters through rubber brake hoses. The use of hoses made from EPDM materials (Ethlene-Propylene-Diene-Materials) will reduce the amount of diffusion OR use steel braided brake hose with a non-rubber sleeve (usually Teflon) to greatly reduce the diffusion process.

THINGS TO REMEMBER
Brake fluids dry boiling point is more important then wet boiling point when used in a racing brake system.
Passenger cars very rarely will undergo a brake fluid change making the wet boiling point more important.
Racing brake system fluid is changed often and a system with fresh fluid will most likely not contain water.
Because of this, racers should be concerned with the dry boiling point.
Racing fluid exceeds DOT 3, 4, and 5.1 dry boiling point specifications.
Never use silicone based fluids in racing brake systems.
Using racing brake fluid will increase performance of the braking system.
Never reuse fluid. º Never mix types or brands of brake fluid.
Use smaller fluid containers that can be used quicker.
If fluid remains in container be sure to tightly seal and do not store for long periods of time.
Purge system (complete drain) and replace fluid often.
Immediately replace master cylinder reservoir cap following any maintenance.
 
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