Hyundai Genesis Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is one particular subject I haven't seen on here. Wrapping stuff for heat management in the engine. There's lots of threads that mention it but none especially for it. Now there is.

I have wrapped things in my 13 2.0T engine to try and protect the intake/IC piping from heat but I haven't touched anything that may mess up my warranty in any way. I figure wrapping a pipe is safe. My IAT has come down a lot since I started this thermal management. Sure, I'd love to do a phenolic spacer, bigger IC etc but I want to preserve the warranty.

There's 2 types of heat wraps I have found for my car. Exhaust wrap which is thick woven glass fiber in a roll that you get at auto parts stores. It's pretty expensive and is held on with metal banding. There's also metallic heat-reflective tape with a thin woven glass backing that sticks on. It also costs a lot for what you get.

-Exhaust wrap is good at keeping heat in and insulating piping. It's a good barrier against convective heat.

-reflective tape is good at keeping radiant heat out, but not insulating. Don't wrap hot stuff in reflective tape as it will only help the hot things radiate heat.

I have my Injen SRI piping wrapped in exhaust wrap and covered in refective tape to protect it from the flaming snail next door. That piping was getting hot to the touch before I wrapped it because of radiant heat AND convective heat in that area. Wrapping it brought my IAT down by about 50%. I measure my IAT over ambient after a 30 min run on the highway. In stop and go traffic it changes so much it's hard to get a definite number. Then I wrapped the post-IC upper part of the piping and the TB with the reflective tape. That piping runs right next to a big hot coolant line that radiates heat. That brought my IAT down about 2C. Just by wrapping (I did some trial and error and ended up wasting a $22 roll of reflective tape) I brought by IAT down quite a bit. With the drilled out hood vents and wrap, my warranty is unaffected and after that 30 min run on the highway my IAT stays steady at 5-6C over ambient. After 2 miles from leaving my house with a cold engine I hit that 5C over ambient and it stays there on the hgihway as long as I keep moving.

What else can be wrapped? What about fuel lines? Cooler fuel is also denser just like air and carries more energy- but will it make any difference in that part of the engine bay?
 

·
Membrah
Joined
·
390 Posts
Have any pics of it all wrapped curious to what it looks like. Did you use the DEI wrap that is found in most auto stores?
 

·
I'd rather do it myself
Joined
·
18,378 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
You don't want to use reflective sleeving on hot piping. It just turns the piping into a radiating heat source unless you have insulated the pipe underneath.

I originally wrapped the hot side IC piping with reflective tape and it INCREASED my IAT. It turned the black silicone into a radiator as the reflective material radiated out the heat from beneath. Use refelctive material on the cold stuff or wrap it with insulating material first.









I'm not sure of the brand that I used. I got it at Advance Auto. The reflective tape is silver, comes on a small roll. the exhaust wrap is right next to it in the same aisle (the exhaust wrap is under the reflective tape on the SRI. The difference in heat soak is dramatic, the SRI aluminum tube only feels warm to the touch, before it was too hot to hold your hand on for more than a few seconds)
 

·
I'd rather do it myself
Joined
·
18,378 Posts
It is not tightly wrapped around the hose so there is some air space between the material and the actual hose. I'll have to dig out my IR sensor to see what the reflective material is radiating out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,111 Posts
Wrapping your exhaust components may reduce heat transfer to other components but you also affect the rate of cooling of the insulated part vs. not insulated and that can change the metallurgy which may also result in cracking. Instead of insulating the hot components you may want to consider just insulating the stuff you want to keep cool with bulk blanket insulation and finish off with the reflective film.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I've read a lot about heat wrapping the turbo and exhaust of Genny's and read some nightmare stories of cracked welds. That's why I decided to wrap the stuff I want to keep cold and leave the hot stuff open to radiate off heat. nyangineer is dead on- I am too conservative with my efforts to go all-out. I think cold side wrapping is a good balance for me of controlling heat but avoiding possible problems.

I've seen turbo blankets for the stock Genny turbo for around $80 online. Wrapping the exhaust wouldn't be all that hard either. It's just for me that the benefit is outweighed by the potential hassle. It's not like a I race or anything- I just like efficiency.

If I could weld, maybe I'd just wrap everything!
 

·
Membrah
Joined
·
390 Posts
link to any threads of people that have cracked their manifolds or other pieces due to wrapping on the genny? Not asking to be a dick, but just genuinely curious. I did a lot of reading myself on wrapping exhaust items and it seems to be the same reiterated scare tactic of things "could" crack. I don't really care about other cars, only the genny. Heat soak is definitely a big problem with these turbo cars and anything aluminum. You should also try the TB coolant bypass to bring down IAT even further (only if your car wont see freezing temps)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I did the bypass and that helps IAT also (Florida :cool: )

It's been an incremental thing for me. A couple degrees cooler here, faster cool down there, slower heat up here, a couple degrees there. I'm still working on it and trying to figure out how to squeeze more efficiency out of the engine in it's nearly stock configuration. A CAI (Florida and it's torrential rains are almost a daily thing in the summer) is out of the question.

http://www.gencoupe.com/2-0t-discussion-2008-2012/111657-result-heat-wrap-weak-welds-manifold.html

First thread after google search. Yeah, early model Gen but I didn't check out the other search results that came up. There were others I think with the late model Gencoupe.

What about the fuel lines? Would that matter at all? @Red Raspberry - can you use your IR thermometer and check the fuel lines in the engine bay and see how hot they are after a hard run? Cooler fuel is denser and packs more punch just like air. In many racing series they test and regulate fuel temps.
 

·
Membrah
Joined
·
390 Posts
yeah its a toss up, some will crack, some wont. Best bang for your buck would be a turbo blanket. I don't know who makes a good one, but I'm positive they can be sourced. I live in Florida too, space coast, I stayed away from any of the SRI or CAI because the piping is usually a thin aluminum. Stock box with a drop in, and a silicon inlet is the way I went. I learned my lessen with heat and Florida with my old wrx. Interested to see what else you do and the turn out though, keep it up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
If I ever get around to removing the front bumper, I want to cut a hole on the fog light cover and run some dryer vent tubing from that hole up to under the cone filter through the hole where the wiper fluid bottle was after I remove that too. I see that sort of tubing run in race cars to the brakes all the time on TV. I'll just channel mine up a little.

But I don't want to remove the bumper, I know I won't be able to get it back on with perfect fitment again. I'd need help from someone with more patience than I have.
 

·
I'd rather do it myself
Joined
·
18,378 Posts
Did you get a chance to measure temps of the fuel lines, RR?
No I don't drive the car much. And by the time you stopped to measure the readings would be skewed. I would guess as long as the car is moving or under full power it doesn't heat up due to the flow of cool fuel, only at idle would there be heat soak. No return setup also keeps the fuel cooler than if it had the returned type system.. I have a SS braided line.

But it would be simple to wrap in insulation if you think it is a problem.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,111 Posts
The nice thing about insulation is that not only does it work to keep heat in but it can also keep heat out. Temperatures under the hood won't matter if all of the important cold surfaces are insulated properly. Exhaust manifold glowing red hot? Who cares if everything else is insulated and is covered by reflective film. I don't see anything good coming from insulating the exhaust manifold, nothing at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Doing both would be more thorough. The reflective tape only goes so far, insulation only goes so far on the cold side stuff too. Wraping everything would be the best way. However, is it worth the possibility of damaging components? I don't think so. It's a compromise to do the cold side only.

I don't know if the fuel lines get hot- if they do, it'd be like the TB coolant bypass. It's not a problem per se, but can it be better? That's what I'd like to know. It doesn't make a huge difference, but a couple degrees is a couple degrees and works toward the greater goal of incremental SAFE gains that don't affect the warranty.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top