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lovin my 300+hp hyundai
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm sorry guys for this dumb question. I'm hoping someone could clarify this for me because a google search gave me tons info but nothing I could really understand. I know my GC Track has a Torsen Differential. My Dad used to have a 96 Camaro Z28 with what he called "posi-traction" where both rear wheels spin instead of just one, is that what the Gen Coupe's does? I'm so confused, and just trying to figure this out. Thanks Everyone.
 

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lovin my 300+hp hyundai
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Discussion Starter #3
I had already used google to look it up, and I'm asking for clarification.

It says: rear - used to apportion appropriate torque distribution between left and right sides in rear axles. This may be on either a rear-wheel drive or four-wheel drive vehicle.

I don't understand what there saying.

I'm sorry I'm not grasping the article. Could someone translate for me.
 

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Former GTO hater/ owner
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I had already used google to look it up, and I'm asking for clarification.

It says: rear - used to apportion appropriate torque distribution between left and right sides in rear axles. This may be on either a rear-wheel drive or four-wheel drive vehicle.

I don't understand what there saying.

I'm sorry I'm not grasping the article. Could someone translate for me.
Halfway down this page is the best description of how it works that I could find Differentials, Limited Slips, and Powertrax Lockers!
 

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Cool vid.

Torsen's work great for FWD's also.

The complex series of gears allows the differential unit to act like a normal open diff when torque is split evenly but still detect when one side (left or right, front or rear) is slipping and bias more torque to the side with more traction, provided both ends of the output can still provide some resistance to twist.

In other words, if you're flying around a track in your GC, the torsen will happily distribute torque to the wheel that is not slipping as you apply throttle (usually the outside wheel during a turn) to help you accelerate out of that turn quickest--up to whatever the bias ratio of that particular torsen is. As long as both ends can provide a resistance.

But if coming out of a turn you manage to get one wheel into the air, now with that wheel in the air and not providing a torque feedback, the diff goes "limp." It just acts like an open diff with all the twist going towards spinning that wheel in the air. Same thing also happens if you get one wheel on ice, etc.

And hence the name "torsen"-- short for torque sensing. Its ability to bias torque, rather than just lock both wheels to spin at the same speed makes this a favorite of road racers.
 

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lovin my 300+hp hyundai
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Discussion Starter #7
Cool vid.

Torsen's work great for FWD's also.

The complex series of gears allows the differential unit to act like a normal open diff when torque is split evenly but still detect when one side (left or right, front or rear) is slipping and bias more torque to the side with more traction, provided both ends of the output can still provide some resistance to twist.

In other words, if you're flying around a track in your GC, the torsen will happily distribute torque to the wheel that is not slipping as you apply throttle (usually the outside wheel during a turn) to help you accelerate out of that turn quickest--up to whatever the bias ratio of that particular torsen is. As long as both ends can provide a resistance.

But if coming out of a turn you manage to get one wheel into the air, now with that wheel in the air and not providing a torque feedback, the diff goes "limp." It just acts like an open diff with all the twist going towards spinning that wheel in the air. Same thing also happens if you get one wheel on ice, etc.

And hence the name "torsen"-- short for torque sensing. Its ability to bias torque, rather than just lock both wheels to spin at the same speed makes this a favorite of road racers.
I can thank you enough, for that explanation. Does this have any general purpose for one wheel stuck in the mud, and one wheel on hard surface? Because without the differential I thought the wheel in the mud would spin away.
 

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You just described the same scenario, the torsen will detect that the wheel in the mud will have less torque getting to the wheel and in turn send more power to the wheel on the hard surface.
 

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It depends.

Like I said, in order for the diff to function, it still requires that there be a measure of resistance from the wheel in the mud/ice/etc. A lot of factors will affect the ability of the wheel in the mud to provide a resistance BACK to the diff.

If you manage to get one wheel in the mud and not enough resistance to function the torsen, a little "trick" that might work is to apply the brakes to provide that needed resistance and in turn allow the traction to be transferred to the wheel with the grip. ;)
 

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If you manage to get one wheel in the mud and not enough resistance to function the torsen, a little "trick" that might work is to apply the brakes to provide that needed resistance and in turn allow the traction to be transferred to the wheel with the grip. ;)
Note that this technique works with conventional cars. On the GC, all bets are off. GC has ABS and EBD along with ETC, I wouldn't be able to tell you if it'd even let you do it, so...results may vary.
 

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I can attest to this.. bald tires in saskatchewan.. with abs the cars a dog to get out of deep snow itll just sit and spin for ever.. what i have found is if your stuck goin forward.. itll almost always unstick by going in reverse.. abs is disabled in reverse
It depends.

Like I said, in order for the diff to function, it still requires that there be a measure of resistance from the wheel in the mud/ice/etc. A lot of factors will affect the ability of the wheel in the mud to provide a resistance BACK to the diff.

If you manage to get one wheel in the mud and not enough resistance to function the torsen, a little "trick" that might work is to apply the brakes to provide that needed resistance and in turn allow the traction to be transferred to the wheel with the grip. ;)
[/QUOT
 

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Also make sure no welds are bronken behind pass. Frint fender.. just had mine fixed.. car would not move in minus 30
I can attest to this.. bald tires in saskatchewan.. with abs the cars a dog to get out of deep snow itll just sit and spin for ever.. what i have found is if your stuck goin forward.. itll almost always unstick by going in reverse.. abs is disabled in reverse
[/QUOT
 

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almost 11 year old thread.

That's not the ABS, it's the traction control. The traction control uses the ABS pump to torque vector the power using the brakes and tells the ECU to cut throttle.

That actual ABS only is used if you start to lock up the brakes, as the can see each of the wheels are spinning.
 
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