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Discussion Starter #1
Looking into a few different models (mainly 2010-12) of genesis to fit my price range of 8k. Ive done a bit of research saying these cars are reliable and some say they arent? Which is it? I plan on keeping the car a few years and modifying it (full bolt ons) to maybe get it to around 325-350hp with a tune reliably since it will be my daily driver.

What is a high mileage genesis to you guys? For the money it will more than likely be over 100k but Im aiming for less than 120k. It will be automatic as well as I commute a lot and travel.

Any common issues or “red flags” when looking at these cars used? Ive heard timing issues with the 3.8s BK1s are common? But how common? As in EVERY gen BK1 has the issue or just a handful?

Also with gas type. Ive heard the ECU will “adjust” to lower octanes so you can run either and be safe? We have 93 as premium. 87 is regular. Since I will be commuting a lot, can I run only 87 in it and then when I want to get full hp and mess around run 93?

I cant think of anything else to ask at the moment. Add anything you guys think I should know... thanks.
 

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In Charge of Snacks
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Hi, and welcome!

These cars are honestly no better nor worse than average on the market for reliability. Personally, I'd go for a relatively low mileage car( say under 60k) and estimate the costs of standard maintenance, then try to get them deducted from the sales price. If you have say a 95k mile car, you can assume it needs new giubos(driveshaft flex couplers), possibly new brake rotors, a timing chain job, a water pump, a power steering pump, all new accessory drive pieces(belt tensioner, pulleys), and probably half the bushings in the suspension. Honestly, that's a lot of cash. Pay a mechanic a couple benjies to go over the car thoroughly, check for cracks in rubber especially. Also, try to find a car that has records of the ATF having been changed at least once. Definitely don't buy one over 65k miles with black/burned ATF that doesn't have a service history showing the fluid was changed at some point.

To be brutally honest, these cars are pretty expensive to maintain compared to their market value. Great ride, and definitely cheap speed, but replacement costs and the like add up real quick. Fortunately, for the experienced, they are very friendly toward owner wrenching and mods.
 

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Bill
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yeah, that's a good point. when i got divorced i couldn't afford to fix my old car so i got a new one... more cash outlays the older you get.
 

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To be brutally honest, these cars are pretty expensive to maintain compared to their market value. Great ride, and definitely cheap speed, but replacement costs and the like add up real quick. Fortunately, for the experienced, they are very friendly toward owner wrenching and mods.
That's usually because people fiddle with them.

After 10 years, the only major normal maintenance things I've had to change are:

rotors/pads ($100 IIRC, OEM)

front hubs ($150 for the pair)

Timing chain kit ($150~$200)

fuses (rarely)

A rear signal bulb

guibos (basically the u-joints for the driveshaft. I think the pair were $150)

fluids and filters


This is over 10 years, and besides fluids and filters, I've only changed those items once. If it's stock, then maintenance-wise, it's like owning any other car.

To OP, make sure it has a service record, or at the very least when the timing chain was replaced.
The stock tune, is tuned for regular gas.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
To be brutally honest, these cars are pretty expensive to maintain compared to their market value. Great ride, and definitely cheap speed, but replacement costs and the like add up real quick. Fortunately, for the experienced, they are very friendly toward owner wrenching and mods.
That's usually because people fiddle with them.

After 10 years, the only major normal maintenance things I've had to change are:

rotors/pads ($100 IIRC, OEM)

front hubs ($150 for the pair)

Timing chain kit ($150~$200)

fuses (rarely)

A rear signal bulb

guibos (basically the u-joints for the driveshaft. I think the pair were $150)

fluids and filters


This is over 10 years, and besides fluids and filters, I've only changed those items once. If it's stock, then maintenance-wise, it's like owning any other car.

To OP, make sure it has a service record, or at the very least when the timing chain was replaced.
The stock tune, is tuned for regular gas.
Thanks. As far as regular maintenance items Im not worried about. Im more worried about the motor being reliable because if it goes than everything else is pointless. If i get a bk1/2 which ever gen I get I plan on getting records for it and if the timing chain wasnt done, that will be the 1st thing I do since it seems to be a common problem and I dont want to deal with it later.

I plan on trying to do most work myself (except timing fix).
 

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I think the coupe is at least as reliable if not more so than any other sports coupe/car of its era. Most of the problems ive read pertain to the clutch/manual transmission, which you said you were strictly looking for an auto model anyway. Generaly speaking id look for the newest/lowest mileage example you can find/afford. Since it is a sports car most owners are going to do at least a little bit of sprited driving which will accelerate wear and tear. Unless you get lucky and find a well kept, lightly used example, Good hunting.
 

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In Charge of Snacks
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Thanks. As far as regular maintenance items Im not worried about. Im more worried about the motor being reliable because if it goes than everything else is pointless. If i get a bk1/2 which ever gen I get I plan on getting records for it and if the timing chain wasnt done, that will be the 1st thing I do since it seems to be a common problem and I dont want to deal with it later.

I plan on trying to do most work myself (except timing fix).
Well, BK1 3.8, worry about the timing and oil pump and the sticky hydraulic timing chain tensioners. This is regular scheduled maint. mind you. Also, these are direct bucket valve actuation, so a valve adjustment is VERY costly labor-wise. And the bucket kit for the adjustments ain't cheap either. If you can and are willing to handle these jobs then you're smooth sailing. Most everything else is reasonable and straight forward as far as replacement of worn parts goes.

BK2 is a slight improvement on the timing system. Same issues apply to lifters, but chains/sprockets/tensioners should be slightly longer lived. I'd personally be worried about the high pressure fuel system and the carbon build-up on the back of the intake valves, however I haven't really heard of that being much of a problem, yet. Seems the BK2 does have some of the kinks worked out a bit better.

I guess in summary, if the engine is all you're worried about and you're not afraid of a wrench, it's likely a great car for you on the reliability front. They are actually fairly overbuilt and understressed.
 
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